Project Title

Improving Male Vaccine Uptake for Human Papilloma Virus in a Family Medicine Residency Program

Authors' Affiliations

Dr. Chris Garner, Dr. Patricia Conner, and Dr. Amanda Stoltz, Department of Family Medicine, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

117

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Amanda Stoltz

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Healthy People 2020 was launched in December 2010 with a target human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rate of 80%. As of 2014, we were well short of this goal, especially among males, for whom the HPV vaccine became recommended in 2011. An estimated 14-20% of adolescent-aged males had completed the vaccine schedule as of 2015. This is particularly problematic in northeast Tennessee, as multiple risk factors for lower vaccination rates are characteristic of the population, including being white and living in the South. Reasons to decline vaccination vary, and usually involve concerns about safety, efficacy, and necessity. Worries about sexual disinhibition from being vaccinated are often cited by opponents. Parents also perceive a lack of benefit from getting the vaccination starting at age 11 before their sons are sexually active. The media and internet are also barriers to appropriate vaccination in males, as previous research has demonstrated that media coverage is more likely to focus on political controversies instead of benefits, and is more likely to emphasize the benefits to females. Research on improving vaccine uptake on males is currently limited. Doctors who appear knowledgeable and are willing to spend time talking about the HPV vaccine for male patients may increase vaccination rates. Other interventions that may also be effective include vaccinating as part of nurse visits or through school programs. Early studies have been mixed on the effect of patient and parent education on vaccine uptake, although a 2015 review demonstrated that most practice- and community-based educational interventions have some positive effect on uptake. The purpose of this project was to improve HPV vaccine uptake among male patients in a family practice residency program through patient and parent education. After informed consent was obtained, the patients and/or their parents were given a handout produced by the CDC highlighting the benefits of vaccination for males. A chart review was done to determine vaccine coverage among males before the intervention instituted in November of 2016. The intervention was completed in August 2017, and a repeat chart review is currently ongoing to determine vaccine coverage in the post-intervention period. Data collection and analysis is ongoing at the time of abstract submission. We expect a statistically significant increase in the number of male patients who have received any doses of vaccine, and in the number who have completed the vaccine series. Future research should involve broadening the intervention to include local family medicine and pediatrician’s offices to increase vaccine uptake in these populations as well.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Improving Male Vaccine Uptake for Human Papilloma Virus in a Family Medicine Residency Program

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Healthy People 2020 was launched in December 2010 with a target human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rate of 80%. As of 2014, we were well short of this goal, especially among males, for whom the HPV vaccine became recommended in 2011. An estimated 14-20% of adolescent-aged males had completed the vaccine schedule as of 2015. This is particularly problematic in northeast Tennessee, as multiple risk factors for lower vaccination rates are characteristic of the population, including being white and living in the South. Reasons to decline vaccination vary, and usually involve concerns about safety, efficacy, and necessity. Worries about sexual disinhibition from being vaccinated are often cited by opponents. Parents also perceive a lack of benefit from getting the vaccination starting at age 11 before their sons are sexually active. The media and internet are also barriers to appropriate vaccination in males, as previous research has demonstrated that media coverage is more likely to focus on political controversies instead of benefits, and is more likely to emphasize the benefits to females. Research on improving vaccine uptake on males is currently limited. Doctors who appear knowledgeable and are willing to spend time talking about the HPV vaccine for male patients may increase vaccination rates. Other interventions that may also be effective include vaccinating as part of nurse visits or through school programs. Early studies have been mixed on the effect of patient and parent education on vaccine uptake, although a 2015 review demonstrated that most practice- and community-based educational interventions have some positive effect on uptake. The purpose of this project was to improve HPV vaccine uptake among male patients in a family practice residency program through patient and parent education. After informed consent was obtained, the patients and/or their parents were given a handout produced by the CDC highlighting the benefits of vaccination for males. A chart review was done to determine vaccine coverage among males before the intervention instituted in November of 2016. The intervention was completed in August 2017, and a repeat chart review is currently ongoing to determine vaccine coverage in the post-intervention period. Data collection and analysis is ongoing at the time of abstract submission. We expect a statistically significant increase in the number of male patients who have received any doses of vaccine, and in the number who have completed the vaccine series. Future research should involve broadening the intervention to include local family medicine and pediatrician’s offices to increase vaccine uptake in these populations as well.