Title

FOMO, Relatedness, and Well-Being in Emerging Adults

Proposal Focus

Research

Abstract

From the viewpoint of Self-Determination Theory, this study evaluated theoretically competing models examining the relationships among one’s fear of missing out (FOMO) and multiple indicators of relatedness (satisfaction and frustration) with well-being (life satisfaction) and ill-being (depression) among a sample of emerging adults. The first model conceptualized that higher levels of FOMO would be related to higher levels of depressive symptomology and lower levels of life satisfaction, and that relationship would be mediated by relatedness satisfaction and frustration. Alternatively, the second model conceptualized that relatedness satisfaction would serve as a moderator of the relationship between FOMO and depressive symptomology and life satisfaction. Model 1 results indicated that an individual’s FOMO was associated with lower relatedness satisfaction and higher relatedness frustration, and, in turn, both forms of relatedness were significantly associated with perceptions of life satisfaction and depression. Model 2 results also indicated that one’s relatedness satisfaction or frustration did not serve as a moderator between the relationship of FOMO and well-being or ill-being. Discussion of the importance of relationship attachments, as well as clinical implications, will be included.

Keywords

FOMO, relatedness, well-being, emerging adults

Location

Tiger II

Start Date

9-3-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

9-3-2018 11:15 AM

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Mar 9th, 10:15 AM Mar 9th, 11:15 AM

FOMO, Relatedness, and Well-Being in Emerging Adults

Tiger II

From the viewpoint of Self-Determination Theory, this study evaluated theoretically competing models examining the relationships among one’s fear of missing out (FOMO) and multiple indicators of relatedness (satisfaction and frustration) with well-being (life satisfaction) and ill-being (depression) among a sample of emerging adults. The first model conceptualized that higher levels of FOMO would be related to higher levels of depressive symptomology and lower levels of life satisfaction, and that relationship would be mediated by relatedness satisfaction and frustration. Alternatively, the second model conceptualized that relatedness satisfaction would serve as a moderator of the relationship between FOMO and depressive symptomology and life satisfaction. Model 1 results indicated that an individual’s FOMO was associated with lower relatedness satisfaction and higher relatedness frustration, and, in turn, both forms of relatedness were significantly associated with perceptions of life satisfaction and depression. Model 2 results also indicated that one’s relatedness satisfaction or frustration did not serve as a moderator between the relationship of FOMO and well-being or ill-being. Discussion of the importance of relationship attachments, as well as clinical implications, will be included.