Degree Name

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy)

Program

Sport Physiology and Performance

Date of Award

8-2019

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

Michael H. Stone

Committee Members

Caleb Bazyler, Brad H. DeWeese, Jeremy Gentles, Nick Fiolo

Abstract

The purposes of this dissertation were to investigate the response of salivary alpha-amylase to a single resistance training session and to a week-long resistance training over-reaching protocol. The major findings of this dissertation are as follows:

Study 1 – A single resistance training session consisting of 5 sets of 10 repetitions of squat and bench press at 95 percent of repetition maximum creates a statistically significant increase in salivary alpha-amylase concentrations.

Study 2 – Two resistance training sessions consisting of 5 sets of 10 repetitions of squat and bench press at 95 percent of repetition maximum within 5 days does not create a statistically significant change in resting baseline salivary alpha-amylase concentrations. These results are corroborated by not causing statistically significant change in perceived stress, as measured by Total Mood Disturbance, calculated from the Profile Of Mood States questionnaire, nor causing a change in perceived stress calculated from the Daily Analysis of Life Demands for Athletes survey.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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