Iron Uptake in Bacteria with Emphasis on E. coli and Pseudomonas

Title

Iron Uptake in Bacteria with Emphasis on E. coli and Pseudomonas

Files

Link to Buy

Download or Purchase

Document Type

Book

Publication Date

2013

Description

Contents: Ferric Siderophore Transport via Outer Membrane Receptors of Escherichia coli: Structural Advancement and A Tribute to Dr. Dick van der Helm -- An 'Ironman' of Siderophore Biology -- The Tricky Ways Bacteria Cope with Iron Limitation -- Iron Transport Systems and Iron Homeostasis in Pseudomonas.

Abstract: Iron is essential for the growth of most bacteria because it serves as a cofactor for vital enzymes and for the components of the electron transport chain. Moreover, Iron plays an important role in bacterial pathogenicity; in fact, the iron transport systems in bacteria works as target for designing novel antibiotics. Because iron is not soluble under aerobic conditions, bacteria have had to find ways to overcome iron deficiency. One of them is producing an iron-chelating small organic molecule called siderophore. Indeed, most bacteria and fungi produce structurally and chemically diverse siderophores which are transported back to the cytoplasm using complex energy dependent transport systems.