Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

May 1999

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior, attitudes, and knowledge regarding tobacco use of students enrolled in orientation courses in Tennessee community colleges. The six community colleges selected for the study were members of the Tennessee Board of Regents system that offered mandatory orientation courses. Data were collected by use of the College Tobacco Behavior, Attitude, and Knowledge Survey . A response rate of (72.5%) from 700 students was analyzed. Three research questions guided the study and 17 null hypotheses were formulated and tested at the.05 alpha level of significance. Data were analyzed by using t -tests, crosstabs, analysis of variance, Chi-square, and Pearson's r correlation coefficients. Results of the study revealed that, of those students who ever smoked regularly, differences in age and ethnicity were found and no differences were found between males and females. There was no difference between males and females and when they first started smoking cigarettes regularly; however, differences were found among students of varying ethnicities. There was no relationship between students' age and how many days they smoked; however, differences were found between males and females and ethnicities. There was no relationship regarding students' age and no difference between males and females and how many days they used smokeless tobacco. There were differences between smokers' and nonsmokers' attitudes pertaining to a smokefree campus, a designated smoking area indoors, and that a tobacco awareness program would be beneficial to college students. There was no relationship between knowledge score and age, and no difference between males and females, and smokers and nonsmokers regarding their knowledge score. However, differences in knowledge scores were found among students of different ethnicities.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access