Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

May 1994

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the beliefs of Tennessee principals and teachers in relation to national standards and national goals. This was a descriptive study, which utilized a survey methodology. The population under study was limited to 232 principals and 268 teachers randomly selected from the 1992-1993 membership of the Tennessee Education Association. The instrument, developed by the researcher for this study, was the National Standards/National Goals Questionnaire. The 32 item instrument was designed to determine the level of belief of national goals and national standards. Descriptive statements were used to analyze the data gathered from the 32 position statements, with the t-test for independent groups and a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). When the overall F-test was significant, a Student-Newman Keuls Post-Hoc Multiple Comparisons Test was used to identify pairwise differences. The descriptive analysis of the 11 null hypotheses warranted the following conclusions: (1) The key to the success of the national standards/national goals program lies within the hands of the local community. (2) National goals will enforce the idea that Tennessee students can learn as well and as much as any student in the world. (3) National goals would cause school curricula to be redesigned. (4) The school system's goals must be in line with national goals. (5) Educators have a high level of commitment to national standards and national goals. (6) National standards would have a positive influence on the quality of public education. (7) National standards would enhance instructional improvement. (8) National standards would not decrease paperwork for educators. (9) National standards would offer a vision of excellence and raise the expectations of all children. (10) By the year 2000, schools would not be free of drugs and violence and offer a disciplined environment conducive to learning.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access