Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

May 1986

Abstract

The problem of this study was to determine whether principals' perceptions of their superintendents' leadership ability were affected by selected demographic variables. This study followed the ex-post facto design. Twelve dimensions of the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire, Form 12 (LBDQ-XII) were selected to assess the perceptions of principals of the leadership behavior of superintendents in Tennessee. Four hundred principals were randomly selected to participate in this study. One hundred sixty-one principals responded and the findings reflect their responses. The unpaired t-test and Analysis of Variance were applied to the data for Hypotheses 1 through 15. The statistical analysis was intended to determine significant differences in the ratings by principals of the leadership behavior of superintendents in Tennessee. The differences showing significance in the study warranted the following conclusions. (1) Male principals rate the leadership behavior of their superintendents higher than female principals when assessing twelve dimensions of leadership behavior. (2) Black and white principals perceive a difference in the leadership behavior of their superintendents when assessing twelve dimensions of leadership behavior. (3) Principals from city and county school systems do perceive a difference in the leadership behavior of their superintendents when assessing twelve dimensions of leadership behavior. (4) Principals with an elected or appointed superintendent perceive a difference in the leadership behavior of their superintendents when assessing twelve dimensions of leadership behavior. (5) Principals with different last dates of attendance of graduate school do perceive a difference in the leadership behavior of their superintendents when assessing twelve dimensions of leadership behavior.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

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