Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

5-2008

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

W. Hal Knight

Committee Members

Glenn Bettis, Harold Lee Daniels, Terrence A. Tollefson

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship that exists between the reported implementation and integration of computer based technology into the middle schools of Tennessee and the achievement test scores of the middle school students in grades 6, 7, and 8.

In January of 2004, 2005, and 2006 the Tennessee Department of Education implemented the EdTech Tennessee Online Technology Evaluation System (E-TOTE) Survey of technology implementation and integration to gather data from public schools. This survey was intended as a means of providing a measure of the status of technology to the federal government required under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation. Annually students in Tennessee take the state mandated Tennessee Comprehensive Achievement Program (TCAP) test. The reports of the test results are aggregated by school and by grade.

This study investigated possible correlations between these 2 sets of data. The technology implementation and integration levels of the schools were analyzed to determine if there were any correlations between reported technology levels for the schools and the school-level TCAP achievement scores in reading and language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Specific technology indicators that were examined included the level of technology integration, teaching and learning, educator preparation and development, administration and support services and infrastructure for technology, number of computers, network access, and capabilities and percentages of 8th grade technology literacy. The study population consisted of 154 middle schools in Tennessee that were comprised of grades 6, 7, and 8 for which school3 level Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program scores were available and who completed the E-TOTE survey in 2004, 2005, and 2006.

The findings include: The correlations identified in this study indicate that there is a very small relationship between the implementation and integration of technology in Tennessee middle schools. The school-level TCAP scores were also found to be increasing for each year from 2004 through 2006 in reading and language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Over the same period the number of computers in these schools are increasing, as is the level of technology implementation and integration as measured by the E-TOTE survey system.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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