Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

5-2009

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

Louise L. MacKay

Committee Members

Terrence A. Tollefson, James H. Lampley, Cecil N. Blankenship

Abstract

With an overwhelming number of students attempting to enter college after high school, the competitive nature of college admissions continues to grow. Colleges and universities are attempting to find the appropriate means to adequately predict collegiate success. Common methods of this prediction have come from a variety of sources most of which are the use of high school performance and standardized college admissions testing. Walters State Community College was chosen for this study because of its open door admission policy that allows for variability in high school academic paths as well as grade point averages and ACT scores students earned in high school.

The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between high school grade point averages, high school academic paths, ACT scores, and 1st-year college success as measured by the number of college credit hours completed and college grade point averages at the end of the 1st semester and at the end of the 1st academic year. The study included 797 high school students entering the college in fall semester 2007 and completing their 1st academic year in spring semester 2008.

The major findings of this study included: university Path students were (a) more likely to have a higher high school grade point average, (b) more likely to have a higher college grade point average and have earned more college credit hours at the end of the 1st semester and year, and (c) were less likely to enroll in remedial and developmental courses. Additionally, a moderate positive relationship was found between high school grade point averages and college grade point averages at the end of the college academic year. High school grade point averages and ACT scores were found to be statistically significant in predicting the number of college credit hours earned at the end of the college academic year.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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