Title

Management of Type 1 Diabetes: A Family Affair

Proposal Focus

Education

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

People who live with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) have to carefully self-administer insulin to keep blood glucose levels in a safe healthy range – a complex and demanding task (WHO, 2016). Social support has been found to alleviate diabetes-stress and increase management behaviors (Mackey et al., 2016). Social support from family members is especially advantageous, however currently no single family-based intervention has been established to show reliable improvements in T1D outcomes (Rosland et al., 2010). A review of the literature reveals that social support promoting autonomy is associated with the best T1D outcomes; social support that undermines autonomy is associated with worse T1D outcomes (Kelly & Berg, 2018). These findings are consistent with the self-determination theory (SDT), which identifies autonomy as a psychological need (Ng et al., 2012). The findings of this literature review support the need for a disease-specific family-based intervention that is built on the foundations of SDT.

Keywords

Type 1 Diabetes, family-based intervention, social support, autonomy, self-determination theory

Location

Wyndsor II

Start Date

3-4-2020 2:05 PM

End Date

3-4-2020 3:15 PM

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Apr 3rd, 2:05 PM Apr 3rd, 3:15 PM

Management of Type 1 Diabetes: A Family Affair

Wyndsor II

People who live with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) have to carefully self-administer insulin to keep blood glucose levels in a safe healthy range – a complex and demanding task (WHO, 2016). Social support has been found to alleviate diabetes-stress and increase management behaviors (Mackey et al., 2016). Social support from family members is especially advantageous, however currently no single family-based intervention has been established to show reliable improvements in T1D outcomes (Rosland et al., 2010). A review of the literature reveals that social support promoting autonomy is associated with the best T1D outcomes; social support that undermines autonomy is associated with worse T1D outcomes (Kelly & Berg, 2018). These findings are consistent with the self-determination theory (SDT), which identifies autonomy as a psychological need (Ng et al., 2012). The findings of this literature review support the need for a disease-specific family-based intervention that is built on the foundations of SDT.