Title

Relationship Satisfaction and Exercise Self-Efficacy Mediated by Mental Health

Proposal Focus

Research

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Can being satisfied in a relationship create the confidence to exercise? Some research suggests a positive relationship between exercise and positive relationship events for both partners (Johnson et al., 2018), yet there may be important mediators between relationships and exercise, that have not been tested. Research has found that higher relationship satisfaction is associated with lower depressive and anxiety symptoms (Whisman, Uebelacker, & Weinstock, 2004). Another important mechanism linked with exercise is self-efficacy—or the confidence to carry out a behavior (i.e., exercise; Jackson, Tucker, & Herman, 2007). Self-efficacy and mental health are also significantly related (Bandura, 1997), as is exercise and mental health (Chekroud et al., 2018). The question remains then, how is relationship satisfaction and exercise self-efficacy linked? Utilizing dyadic data from 234 heterosexual couples, the purpose of the current study was to determine the association between relationship satisfaction and exercise self-efficacy mediated through mental health.

Keywords

Relationships, exercise, mental health

Location

Yorkshire

Start Date

4-4-2020 10:15 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 11:15 AM

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Apr 4th, 10:15 AM Apr 4th, 11:15 AM

Relationship Satisfaction and Exercise Self-Efficacy Mediated by Mental Health

Yorkshire

Can being satisfied in a relationship create the confidence to exercise? Some research suggests a positive relationship between exercise and positive relationship events for both partners (Johnson et al., 2018), yet there may be important mediators between relationships and exercise, that have not been tested. Research has found that higher relationship satisfaction is associated with lower depressive and anxiety symptoms (Whisman, Uebelacker, & Weinstock, 2004). Another important mechanism linked with exercise is self-efficacy—or the confidence to carry out a behavior (i.e., exercise; Jackson, Tucker, & Herman, 2007). Self-efficacy and mental health are also significantly related (Bandura, 1997), as is exercise and mental health (Chekroud et al., 2018). The question remains then, how is relationship satisfaction and exercise self-efficacy linked? Utilizing dyadic data from 234 heterosexual couples, the purpose of the current study was to determine the association between relationship satisfaction and exercise self-efficacy mediated through mental health.