Title

Relationship Satisfaction & Diet: Exploring the Mechanisms through which Intimate Relationships Influence Physical Health

Proposal Focus

Research

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Understanding how intimate relationships influence physical health has been an important topic of focus; however, research remains unclear on the mechanisms through which this influence occurs. The purpose of this study was to examine how relationship satisfaction relates to diet quality, through mental health (depression and anxiety) and diet self-efficacy. Using a dyadic mediation model with a sample of 234 heterosexual couples, researchers found that women's higher relationship satisfaction was associated with better diet through lower depression and higher diet self-efficacy. Results revealed the same association between women's relationship satisfaction and diet through lower anxiety. Interestingly, rather than mediation through mental health, the association between men's relationship satisfaction and diet was mediated through their partners' diet self-efficacy. This presentation will review the gendered pathways by which relationship satisfaction influences diet in heterosexual couples and discuss the important implications of these findings for tracing how intimate relationships affect overall well-being.

Keywords

Relationship Satisfaction, Diet, Health, Self-Efficacy

Location

Yorkshire

Start Date

4-4-2020 10:15 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 11:15 AM

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Apr 4th, 10:15 AM Apr 4th, 11:15 AM

Relationship Satisfaction & Diet: Exploring the Mechanisms through which Intimate Relationships Influence Physical Health

Yorkshire

Understanding how intimate relationships influence physical health has been an important topic of focus; however, research remains unclear on the mechanisms through which this influence occurs. The purpose of this study was to examine how relationship satisfaction relates to diet quality, through mental health (depression and anxiety) and diet self-efficacy. Using a dyadic mediation model with a sample of 234 heterosexual couples, researchers found that women's higher relationship satisfaction was associated with better diet through lower depression and higher diet self-efficacy. Results revealed the same association between women's relationship satisfaction and diet through lower anxiety. Interestingly, rather than mediation through mental health, the association between men's relationship satisfaction and diet was mediated through their partners' diet self-efficacy. This presentation will review the gendered pathways by which relationship satisfaction influences diet in heterosexual couples and discuss the important implications of these findings for tracing how intimate relationships affect overall well-being.