Title

Sex Trafficking Survivors’ Perspectives on Relational Resources

Proposal Focus

Research

Abstract

Many sex trafficking survivors report problems in their interpersonal relationships, yet few studies have investigated the nuance of these important relational bonds. This phenomenological study began addressing this gap by exploring survivors’ perceptions of the quality and utility of their relationships with family members, peers, and service providers, specifically in the context of transitioning out of sex trafficking. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with six survivors in a residential recovery program. Analyses yielded three themes that represented distinct relational domains (1. non-professional, 2. professional, and 3. spirituality) and sub-codes which appeared to highlight nuance within each domain in the sense that some relationships were simultaneously helpful and challenging to negotiate. This poster will provide an overview of themes and codes, as well as a description of the practical significance of the results. Findings help extend existing literature and may inform potential modifications to resources provided by recovery programs.

Keywords

Sex trafficking, Interpersonal relationships, Qualitative

Location

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Start Date

12-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2019 11:00 AM

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Apr 12th, 10:00 AM Apr 12th, 11:00 AM

Sex Trafficking Survivors’ Perspectives on Relational Resources

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Many sex trafficking survivors report problems in their interpersonal relationships, yet few studies have investigated the nuance of these important relational bonds. This phenomenological study began addressing this gap by exploring survivors’ perceptions of the quality and utility of their relationships with family members, peers, and service providers, specifically in the context of transitioning out of sex trafficking. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with six survivors in a residential recovery program. Analyses yielded three themes that represented distinct relational domains (1. non-professional, 2. professional, and 3. spirituality) and sub-codes which appeared to highlight nuance within each domain in the sense that some relationships were simultaneously helpful and challenging to negotiate. This poster will provide an overview of themes and codes, as well as a description of the practical significance of the results. Findings help extend existing literature and may inform potential modifications to resources provided by recovery programs.