Title

The Effects of Military Specific Stressors on Military-Dependent Youth Attachment: The Role of Perceived Maternal Nurturance

Proposal Focus

Research

Abstract

Children who live within the U.S. military community have unique experiences. In addition to the foundational processes related to child development, military-dependent youths are subject to military specific stressors (MSS) such as frequent relocation, adjustment to new school environments, and parental separation due to deployment. Some research suggests these experiences build resiliency, whereas others suggest they undermine it. Due to these mixed findings there is a gap in the research. This study examines the extent to which military stressors are associated with attachment insecurity, and whether these links are dependent on the military dependent youth’s perception of their mother’s degree of nurturing behavior during times of stress. We expect that the positive association between MSS and attachment insecurity will be weakened when individuals report higher maternal nurturance. As data collection is not yet complete, preliminary results will be shared at the conference. Estimated date of completion is March 1, 2019.

Keywords

Attachment, Mothers, Military, Nurturance, Stressors, Children

Location

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Start Date

12-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

12-4-2019 10:00 AM

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Apr 12th, 9:15 AM Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

The Effects of Military Specific Stressors on Military-Dependent Youth Attachment: The Role of Perceived Maternal Nurturance

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Children who live within the U.S. military community have unique experiences. In addition to the foundational processes related to child development, military-dependent youths are subject to military specific stressors (MSS) such as frequent relocation, adjustment to new school environments, and parental separation due to deployment. Some research suggests these experiences build resiliency, whereas others suggest they undermine it. Due to these mixed findings there is a gap in the research. This study examines the extent to which military stressors are associated with attachment insecurity, and whether these links are dependent on the military dependent youth’s perception of their mother’s degree of nurturing behavior during times of stress. We expect that the positive association between MSS and attachment insecurity will be weakened when individuals report higher maternal nurturance. As data collection is not yet complete, preliminary results will be shared at the conference. Estimated date of completion is March 1, 2019.