Title

The Role of Faith, Religion, and Spirituality During Pregnancy: An Empirical and Theoretical Review

Proposal Focus

Research

Abstract

Objective: The goal of this empirical and theoretical review was to examine how pregnant women used faith, religion, and spirituality as stress-related coping mechanisms throughout their pregnancies. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted to identify relevant studies, and a total of 10 peer-reviewed articles were included in this review based on the inclusion criteria. Results: Three major themes emerged from the review. Faith, religion, and spirituality were 1) a more common form of coping than optimism, 2) a useful stress-reducing resource among those who value it, and 3) viewed as being as impactful as preparation throughout pregnancy. Two primary theories were invoked across this research: coping theory and hope theory. Conclusions: This review provides a look at the state-of-the-science on how faith, religion, and spirituality are used as a coping mechanism during pregnancy and identifies meaningful gaps in the literature with regard to theory and research.

Keywords

Pregnancy, religion, faith, spirituality, stress, coping theory, hope theory

Location

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Start Date

12-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2019 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

The Role of Faith, Religion, and Spirituality During Pregnancy: An Empirical and Theoretical Review

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Objective: The goal of this empirical and theoretical review was to examine how pregnant women used faith, religion, and spirituality as stress-related coping mechanisms throughout their pregnancies. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted to identify relevant studies, and a total of 10 peer-reviewed articles were included in this review based on the inclusion criteria. Results: Three major themes emerged from the review. Faith, religion, and spirituality were 1) a more common form of coping than optimism, 2) a useful stress-reducing resource among those who value it, and 3) viewed as being as impactful as preparation throughout pregnancy. Two primary theories were invoked across this research: coping theory and hope theory. Conclusions: This review provides a look at the state-of-the-science on how faith, religion, and spirituality are used as a coping mechanism during pregnancy and identifies meaningful gaps in the literature with regard to theory and research.