Title

Tracking the Cycle: A Glimpse into EFFT

Proposal Focus

Practice

Abstract

Emotionally Focused Therapy has been shown to produce statistically significant and sustainable change in couples (Wiebe, Johnson, Lafontaine, Burgess Moser, Dalgleish, & Tasca, 2017). This change has also been shown to extend to the family system through the use of Emotionally Focused Family Therapy (Stavrianopoulos, Faller, & Furrow, 2014). The methodology focuses on developing resilience through the co-regulation of the family system by developing secure attachment bonds (Wiebe & Johnson, 2017). EFFT strives to develop a high level of security within families that promotes more fluid communication patterns and more flexible problem solving strategies (Johnson & Lee, 2005). One of the most important steps in developing this security is by clarifying the current interactional cycles taking place, which typically leave the attachment needs of the family unmet (Johnson & Brubacher, 2016). Clinicians who help clients track their interactional cycles lay the foundation for effective change.

Keywords

Emotionally Focused Family Therapy (EFFT), attachment theory, externalization, interactional cycles

Location

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Start Date

12-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2019 12:00 PM

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Tracking the Cycle: A Glimpse into EFFT

Cornerstone Ballroom Side B

Emotionally Focused Therapy has been shown to produce statistically significant and sustainable change in couples (Wiebe, Johnson, Lafontaine, Burgess Moser, Dalgleish, & Tasca, 2017). This change has also been shown to extend to the family system through the use of Emotionally Focused Family Therapy (Stavrianopoulos, Faller, & Furrow, 2014). The methodology focuses on developing resilience through the co-regulation of the family system by developing secure attachment bonds (Wiebe & Johnson, 2017). EFFT strives to develop a high level of security within families that promotes more fluid communication patterns and more flexible problem solving strategies (Johnson & Lee, 2005). One of the most important steps in developing this security is by clarifying the current interactional cycles taking place, which typically leave the attachment needs of the family unmet (Johnson & Brubacher, 2016). Clinicians who help clients track their interactional cycles lay the foundation for effective change.