Title

Relationship between Internal and External Estimates of Training Load Using Wearable Inertial Sensors.

Document Type

Presentation

Publication Date

2-1-2015

Description

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between an external estimate of training load obtained from a wearable accelerometer device and perceived training load in women’s volleyball. METHODS: Participants of this study were thirteen NCAA Division I women’s volleyball players (Age: 20.3±1.2 y, height: 174.9±7.9cm, body mass: 68.1±12.7 kg). A wearable accelerometer device (Catapult Sports, MiniMaxX S4) was used to estimate external training load during volleyball practice sessions. In addition, following each session a rating of perceived exertion was obtained from each player using a 0-10 scale. Based on previously established methods, ratings of perceived exertion were then multiplied by the duration of practice in minutes to provide an estimate of internal training load. A Pearson product-moment zero order correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship between external and internal training load estimates for each individual over eight practices. RESULTS: On average a positive relationship (r = 0.75±0.15) was found between training load estimates. Individual r values ranged from 0.39 to 0.92, with eight of the thirteen achieving statistical significance (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Based on the relationships found between internal and external estimates of training load, both methods may be considered as an option for quantifying on-court training loads in NCAA women’s volleyball. However, the degree to which these estimates relate may vary by individual.

Location

Jacksonville, FL

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS