Project Title

The Association Between ENDS Use and First-Degree Family History of Addiction

Authors' Affiliations

Thalia P. Sullivan, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Shelby L. McKinley, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Hannah G. Mitchell, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Meredith K. Ginley, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Psychology

Type

Oral Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Psychology

Abstract Text

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) use increases risk of nicotine addiction, impairs brain development, and exposes users to harmful chemicals. Despite these risks, rates of use have been increasing among college student populations. Moreover, family history of addiction (FHA) is a risk factor for substance use disorders. Research has yet to examine the extent FHA has on the risk of ENDS use. The current research examines the effect of FHA on lifetime ENDS use and whether ENDS use is more common in participants with FHA and current alcohol or drug use.

Participants (N=2,174) were undergraduates recruited from eight southern universities. Participants were 18 to 24 (Mage=19.25). The sample was 73% female, with the following racial identifications: Caucasian (74.9%), followed by Black/African American (8.8%), Asian (6.7%), multiracial (4.7%), other (3.7%), Middle Eastern (.8%), and American Indian/Alaska Native (.3%).

Lifetime ENDS use was measured using the Cigarette and E-Cigarette Use Questionnaire. FHA was measured by participant report of first-degree relatives with a drug or alcohol addiction history. Participant alcohol and drug use were measured via the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and Drug Use Disorders Identification Test.

Fifty-five percent of participants had used ENDS products during their lifetime (Mage of first use=13.16, SD=4.63), and 12.5% of the sample reported FHA. A linear regression examined if FHA corresponded with ENDS use. The results were significant, F(1,2158)=10.37, p=.001, R2=.005. FHA significantly predicted ENDS use, β=-0.069, t(2158)=-3.22, p=.001.

A chi-square of independence examined the relation between ENDS use and alcohol intake in individuals who disclosed FHA. A significant relation was found, χ2=(1,N=176)=32.20, pχ2=(1,N=176)=9.49, p=.002, with participants who reported no drug use being more likely to engage in ENDS use (86%), compared to those who did report drug use (14%).

The present study’s results documented there was a significant negative relation between FHA and ENDS use, such that participants who reported FHA presented decreased ENDS use. These findings are contrary to the literature that documents increased cigarette use among young adults with FHA. In addition, participants who disclosed FHA and current alcohol intake exhibited increased ENDS use. However, the participants who disclosed FHA and current drug use exhibited decreased ENDS use. Our results suggest that future research should examine the extent at which individuals who engage in drug use focus more on their substance of choice rather than ENDS products, as well as investigate other risk behaviors that could impact lifetime ENDS use among this population.

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The Association Between ENDS Use and First-Degree Family History of Addiction

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) use increases risk of nicotine addiction, impairs brain development, and exposes users to harmful chemicals. Despite these risks, rates of use have been increasing among college student populations. Moreover, family history of addiction (FHA) is a risk factor for substance use disorders. Research has yet to examine the extent FHA has on the risk of ENDS use. The current research examines the effect of FHA on lifetime ENDS use and whether ENDS use is more common in participants with FHA and current alcohol or drug use.

Participants (N=2,174) were undergraduates recruited from eight southern universities. Participants were 18 to 24 (Mage=19.25). The sample was 73% female, with the following racial identifications: Caucasian (74.9%), followed by Black/African American (8.8%), Asian (6.7%), multiracial (4.7%), other (3.7%), Middle Eastern (.8%), and American Indian/Alaska Native (.3%).

Lifetime ENDS use was measured using the Cigarette and E-Cigarette Use Questionnaire. FHA was measured by participant report of first-degree relatives with a drug or alcohol addiction history. Participant alcohol and drug use were measured via the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and Drug Use Disorders Identification Test.

Fifty-five percent of participants had used ENDS products during their lifetime (Mage of first use=13.16, SD=4.63), and 12.5% of the sample reported FHA. A linear regression examined if FHA corresponded with ENDS use. The results were significant, F(1,2158)=10.37, p=.001, R2=.005. FHA significantly predicted ENDS use, β=-0.069, t(2158)=-3.22, p=.001.

A chi-square of independence examined the relation between ENDS use and alcohol intake in individuals who disclosed FHA. A significant relation was found, χ2=(1,N=176)=32.20, pχ2=(1,N=176)=9.49, p=.002, with participants who reported no drug use being more likely to engage in ENDS use (86%), compared to those who did report drug use (14%).

The present study’s results documented there was a significant negative relation between FHA and ENDS use, such that participants who reported FHA presented decreased ENDS use. These findings are contrary to the literature that documents increased cigarette use among young adults with FHA. In addition, participants who disclosed FHA and current alcohol intake exhibited increased ENDS use. However, the participants who disclosed FHA and current drug use exhibited decreased ENDS use. Our results suggest that future research should examine the extent at which individuals who engage in drug use focus more on their substance of choice rather than ENDS products, as well as investigate other risk behaviors that could impact lifetime ENDS use among this population.

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