Project Title

I.M.P.A.C.T. of Interprofessional Student Teams at a Remote Area Medical Clinic in Rural Appalachia

Authors' Affiliations

McKayla Barker, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Angela Chrisman, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Mason Johnson, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Matthew Gouge, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Dr. Emily Flores, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Type

Oral Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Rural Health

Abstract Text

Introduction: Remote Area Medical (RAM), a non-profit organization serving underserved populations, partnered with East Tennessee State University to provide a unique learning opportunity for student volunteers at a clinic in rural Appalachia. Interprofessional student teams were established with undergraduate and graduate students in multiple professions. This study examined the impact on attitudes of students who participated and the impact of student teams on the event, hypothesizing that a positive impact would be seen on both. COVID-19 adjustments made were also evaluated.

Methods: Surveys of student participants were conducted electronically utilizing REDCap before and after participation in the event. Surveys included demographic questions, validated surveys, and open-ended questions. Demographic questions gauged personal background, level of education, and history of interprofessional education or events. The previously validated surveys utilized were the Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Scale-Revised (ICAAS-R) and the Student Perceptions of Interprofessional Clinical Education-Revised Instrument Version 2 (SPICE-R2). Quantitative data was analyzed with SPSS version 25. Qualitative data was analyzed with deductive coding. Interventions were tallied by student teams during the event.

Results: Eighty-nine students participated logging 1,213 interventions and 84 completed portions of the survey (94% response rate). ICAAS-R (n=79) displayed mean increases from 4.19 out of 5 in the pre-survey to 4.58 in the post-survey (p

Conclusion: Statistically significant quantitative findings and qualitative themes supported the hypothesis that working in interprofessional teams at a RAM event would positively impact student attitudes towards interprofessional practice, and that student teams would have a positive impact on the event. COVID-19 adjustments made were well perceived. Findings can be summarized with the I.M.P.A.C.T. neumonic.

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I.M.P.A.C.T. of Interprofessional Student Teams at a Remote Area Medical Clinic in Rural Appalachia

Introduction: Remote Area Medical (RAM), a non-profit organization serving underserved populations, partnered with East Tennessee State University to provide a unique learning opportunity for student volunteers at a clinic in rural Appalachia. Interprofessional student teams were established with undergraduate and graduate students in multiple professions. This study examined the impact on attitudes of students who participated and the impact of student teams on the event, hypothesizing that a positive impact would be seen on both. COVID-19 adjustments made were also evaluated.

Methods: Surveys of student participants were conducted electronically utilizing REDCap before and after participation in the event. Surveys included demographic questions, validated surveys, and open-ended questions. Demographic questions gauged personal background, level of education, and history of interprofessional education or events. The previously validated surveys utilized were the Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Scale-Revised (ICAAS-R) and the Student Perceptions of Interprofessional Clinical Education-Revised Instrument Version 2 (SPICE-R2). Quantitative data was analyzed with SPSS version 25. Qualitative data was analyzed with deductive coding. Interventions were tallied by student teams during the event.

Results: Eighty-nine students participated logging 1,213 interventions and 84 completed portions of the survey (94% response rate). ICAAS-R (n=79) displayed mean increases from 4.19 out of 5 in the pre-survey to 4.58 in the post-survey (p

Conclusion: Statistically significant quantitative findings and qualitative themes supported the hypothesis that working in interprofessional teams at a RAM event would positively impact student attitudes towards interprofessional practice, and that student teams would have a positive impact on the event. COVID-19 adjustments made were well perceived. Findings can be summarized with the I.M.P.A.C.T. neumonic.

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