Project Title

Assessing self-efficacy in families of children with hearing concerns through an audiological early intervention training

Authors' Affiliations

Abigail Lesley, B.S., Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Clinical Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Karee Diem, B.S., Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Clinical Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Marcy Hite, Au.D., Ph.D., Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Clinical Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Audiology & Speech Pathology

Additional Sponsors

Dr. Marcy Hite, Dr. Shannon Bramlette, and Dr. Jacek Smurzynski

Type

Oral Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Family Health Services

Abstract Text

Assessing self-efficacy in families of children with hearing concerns through an audiological early intervention training.

Abigail Lesley, B.S., Karee Diem, B.S., and Marcy Hite, Au.D., Ph.D., Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

For children with hearing loss, spoken language outcomes are best when children have optimal auditory access through the consistent use of appropriately fitted hearing devices and are exposed to a rich linguistic environment. Parents can play a large role in facilitating their children’s use of hearing devices and supporting their language development. The purpose of this study was to improve of parent self-efficacy, increase family knowledge on language outcomes, and increase consistent use of amplification by providing an educational workshop to families with children identified with hearing loss and/or hearing concerns. The hypothesis of this study was to see an enhancement of self-efficacy skills within parent participants to empower and grow confidence in their ability to optimize their child’s amplification use and linguistic exposure. Participants were educated on the impact of hearing loss and/or hearing concerns on language development, importance of language exposure, use and care of amplification for families that utilize hearing technology, and empowerment to establish consistent device use. Assessment of self-efficacy skills in parents were measured through a pre- and post-survey distributed to participants. Survey and study were modeled after Ambrose et al., 2020 using the Scale of Parent Involvement and Self-Efficacy-Revised (SPISE-R). It queries parents about their child’s hearing device use and their perceptions of their own beliefs, knowledge, confidence, and actions pertaining to supporting their child’s auditory access and spoken language development. Ambrose et al., 2020 found the SPISE-R to be a promising tool for use in early intervention to better understand parents’ strengths and needs pertaining to supporting their young child’s auditory access and spoken language development. A total of nine parents were in attendance of the educational workshop conducted with only three participants completing both the pre- and post-survey. An analysis using a paired samples t-test revealed no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-survey across all categories assessed within the SPISE-R apart from one question within the ‘Confidence’ category. Parents were found to have a significantly worse score between pre- and post-survey responses in the ‘Confidence’ category for the following question “If applicable, Put and keep my child’s hearing device(s) on him/her”. The overall mean significantly decreased between the pre- and post-survey, indicating less confidence with this skill. It should be noted, limited parent responses impacted the statistical analysis performed. Although the overall findings were not statistically significant, moving forward, data findings will be used to appropriately adjust the audiological early intervention training to improve self-efficacy skills of parents.

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Assessing self-efficacy in families of children with hearing concerns through an audiological early intervention training

Assessing self-efficacy in families of children with hearing concerns through an audiological early intervention training.

Abigail Lesley, B.S., Karee Diem, B.S., and Marcy Hite, Au.D., Ph.D., Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

For children with hearing loss, spoken language outcomes are best when children have optimal auditory access through the consistent use of appropriately fitted hearing devices and are exposed to a rich linguistic environment. Parents can play a large role in facilitating their children’s use of hearing devices and supporting their language development. The purpose of this study was to improve of parent self-efficacy, increase family knowledge on language outcomes, and increase consistent use of amplification by providing an educational workshop to families with children identified with hearing loss and/or hearing concerns. The hypothesis of this study was to see an enhancement of self-efficacy skills within parent participants to empower and grow confidence in their ability to optimize their child’s amplification use and linguistic exposure. Participants were educated on the impact of hearing loss and/or hearing concerns on language development, importance of language exposure, use and care of amplification for families that utilize hearing technology, and empowerment to establish consistent device use. Assessment of self-efficacy skills in parents were measured through a pre- and post-survey distributed to participants. Survey and study were modeled after Ambrose et al., 2020 using the Scale of Parent Involvement and Self-Efficacy-Revised (SPISE-R). It queries parents about their child’s hearing device use and their perceptions of their own beliefs, knowledge, confidence, and actions pertaining to supporting their child’s auditory access and spoken language development. Ambrose et al., 2020 found the SPISE-R to be a promising tool for use in early intervention to better understand parents’ strengths and needs pertaining to supporting their young child’s auditory access and spoken language development. A total of nine parents were in attendance of the educational workshop conducted with only three participants completing both the pre- and post-survey. An analysis using a paired samples t-test revealed no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-survey across all categories assessed within the SPISE-R apart from one question within the ‘Confidence’ category. Parents were found to have a significantly worse score between pre- and post-survey responses in the ‘Confidence’ category for the following question “If applicable, Put and keep my child’s hearing device(s) on him/her”. The overall mean significantly decreased between the pre- and post-survey, indicating less confidence with this skill. It should be noted, limited parent responses impacted the statistical analysis performed. Although the overall findings were not statistically significant, moving forward, data findings will be used to appropriately adjust the audiological early intervention training to improve self-efficacy skills of parents.

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