Project Title

Domestic Violence as a Risk Factor in HIV Positivity: An Analysis of Mozambican Women

Authors' Affiliations

Joshua Fortmann, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Sciences

Type

Oral Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Public Health

Abstract Text

Domestic violence has long been studied as a factor in health issues, specifically chronic illness and mental health issues. However, less research has been conducted concerning domestic violence as a risk factor for certain infectious diseases. Mozambique has alarmingly high rates of both domestic violence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The object of this research is to ascertain if there is link between women who suffer from domestic violence and risk of being HIV positive. The data used for this analysis was obtained from a 2018 survey conducted in Mozambique by the Department of Health Surveys (DHS). The data was cleaned to remove any observations that did not contain responses to relevant questions surrounding domestic violence and HIV positivity. The final population used for analysis was 2125 individuals. During analysis, age was identified as a possible confounder, and was included in analysis as well as in the final logistic model. A chi squared test was performed which indicated that a relationship exists between Domestic Violence and HIV Positivity (p=.0003). A second chi squared test also indicated a relationship between Age and HIV Positivity (p=

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Domestic Violence as a Risk Factor in HIV Positivity: An Analysis of Mozambican Women

Domestic violence has long been studied as a factor in health issues, specifically chronic illness and mental health issues. However, less research has been conducted concerning domestic violence as a risk factor for certain infectious diseases. Mozambique has alarmingly high rates of both domestic violence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The object of this research is to ascertain if there is link between women who suffer from domestic violence and risk of being HIV positive. The data used for this analysis was obtained from a 2018 survey conducted in Mozambique by the Department of Health Surveys (DHS). The data was cleaned to remove any observations that did not contain responses to relevant questions surrounding domestic violence and HIV positivity. The final population used for analysis was 2125 individuals. During analysis, age was identified as a possible confounder, and was included in analysis as well as in the final logistic model. A chi squared test was performed which indicated that a relationship exists between Domestic Violence and HIV Positivity (p=.0003). A second chi squared test also indicated a relationship between Age and HIV Positivity (p=

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