Project Title

Gender Differences in Early Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco Use with Anxiety in US Adults

Authors' Affiliations

Christian Nwabueze , Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA Shaoqing Gong , School of Public Policy and Administration, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China Nianyang Wang , Department of Health Services Administration, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA Xin Xie , Department of Economics and Finance, College of Business and Technology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA Kesheng Wang , Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137A

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:20 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 9:35 AM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Biostatistics & Epidemiology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kesheng Wang

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Healthcare and Medicine

Abstract Text

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have focused on early alcohol, tobacco and drug use prior to 18 years of age and their relationship with anxiety; while no study has checked the gender differences of these factors with anxiety.

Methods: This study included 6,057 adults with anxiety in the past year and 71,868 controls from the combined data of 2013 and 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The weighted multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of early alcohol, tobacco and drug use prior to 18 years of age with anxiety. The odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated.

Results: The overall prevalence of anxiety was 6.8% (4.4% and 9.1% for males and females, respectively). Weighted multiple logistic regression showed that cigarettes use, inhalant use, marijuana use and other illicit drugs use revealed significant associations with anxiety (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.04-1.33, OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.10-1.56, OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.01-1.32, and OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.17-1.48, respectively). Stratified by gender, cigarettes use, inhalant use, marijuana use and other illicit drugs use were associated with anxiety in females only.

Conclusion: Early tobacco and drug use prior to 18 years of age were found to be associated with increased odds of adult anxiety and that such associations differed by gender.

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Apr 12th, 9:20 AM Apr 12th, 9:35 AM

Gender Differences in Early Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco Use with Anxiety in US Adults

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137A

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have focused on early alcohol, tobacco and drug use prior to 18 years of age and their relationship with anxiety; while no study has checked the gender differences of these factors with anxiety.

Methods: This study included 6,057 adults with anxiety in the past year and 71,868 controls from the combined data of 2013 and 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The weighted multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of early alcohol, tobacco and drug use prior to 18 years of age with anxiety. The odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated.

Results: The overall prevalence of anxiety was 6.8% (4.4% and 9.1% for males and females, respectively). Weighted multiple logistic regression showed that cigarettes use, inhalant use, marijuana use and other illicit drugs use revealed significant associations with anxiety (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.04-1.33, OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.10-1.56, OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.01-1.32, and OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.17-1.48, respectively). Stratified by gender, cigarettes use, inhalant use, marijuana use and other illicit drugs use were associated with anxiety in females only.

Conclusion: Early tobacco and drug use prior to 18 years of age were found to be associated with increased odds of adult anxiety and that such associations differed by gender.