Project Title

Association between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Risky Sexual Behavior among Adults in Munsieville Township, South Africa

Authors' Affiliations

A Taylor Walker Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Ifeoma D. Ozodiegwu DrPH Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Megan Quinn DrPH Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Clinch Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

174

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Biostatistics & Epidemiology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Megan Quinn

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Dual Enrollment

Project's Category

International Health, Public Health, Womens Health

Abstract Text

Exposure to violence and dysfunction in childhood is a major public health concern. The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study demonstrated that childhood maltreatment and family dysfunction impact adult health, contributing to risk behaviors, infectious and chronic disease, and premature death. South Africa (SA) has one of the highest rates of violence and family dysfunction globally, and those living in townships are suspected to be disproportionately affected. Munsieville, the oldest undeveloped township in SA, has reported high rates of violence in the community. This study aimed evaluate the association between a history of childhood sexual abuse and various forms of risky sexual behavior. Data were collected by a team of researchers from the College of Public Health as part of a pilot study of ACEs in Munsieville. Self-report of sexual abuse before age 18 was used to compute the independent variable, which ranged from 0-1, with 0 implying the absence of any type of childhood sexual abuse and 1 implying one or more forms of childhood sexual abuse. Age and gender were deemed potential confounders. Two binary l outcomes representing forms of risky sexual behavior were considered, self-report of transactional sex and substance use before sexual activity. Descriptive analysis examined the frequency of childhood sexual abuse by each category of the study outcomes. Two multiple logistic regression models were individually constructed to examine the association between childhood sexual abuse and transactional sex, and substance use before sexual activity. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were reported. Findings of the descriptive analysis indicated that 8.83% (43) of the sample reported participating in transactional sex, 22.4% (101) reported using either drugs or alcohol before sex. Moreover, 21.6% (103) reported experiencing one or more forms of childhood sexual abuse. A positive statistically significant association between self-reported childhood sexual abuse and transactional sex was identified (OR: 3.45; 95% CI: 1.71 – 6.98), illustrating that those who experienced any type of child sexual abuse had a 3.5 times as likely to report transactional sex compared to those who did not experience sexual abuse during childhood. Childhood sexual abuse was also significantly associated with substance use before sexual activity (OR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.11 – 3.34). The study findings suggests a need for further research to understand the long term effects of child sexual abuse. Further, future public health interventions aimed at reducing sexual abuse and violence inflicted on South African children should be employed as means to improve their wellbeing in adulthood.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Association between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Risky Sexual Behavior among Adults in Munsieville Township, South Africa

Clinch Mtn

Exposure to violence and dysfunction in childhood is a major public health concern. The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study demonstrated that childhood maltreatment and family dysfunction impact adult health, contributing to risk behaviors, infectious and chronic disease, and premature death. South Africa (SA) has one of the highest rates of violence and family dysfunction globally, and those living in townships are suspected to be disproportionately affected. Munsieville, the oldest undeveloped township in SA, has reported high rates of violence in the community. This study aimed evaluate the association between a history of childhood sexual abuse and various forms of risky sexual behavior. Data were collected by a team of researchers from the College of Public Health as part of a pilot study of ACEs in Munsieville. Self-report of sexual abuse before age 18 was used to compute the independent variable, which ranged from 0-1, with 0 implying the absence of any type of childhood sexual abuse and 1 implying one or more forms of childhood sexual abuse. Age and gender were deemed potential confounders. Two binary l outcomes representing forms of risky sexual behavior were considered, self-report of transactional sex and substance use before sexual activity. Descriptive analysis examined the frequency of childhood sexual abuse by each category of the study outcomes. Two multiple logistic regression models were individually constructed to examine the association between childhood sexual abuse and transactional sex, and substance use before sexual activity. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were reported. Findings of the descriptive analysis indicated that 8.83% (43) of the sample reported participating in transactional sex, 22.4% (101) reported using either drugs or alcohol before sex. Moreover, 21.6% (103) reported experiencing one or more forms of childhood sexual abuse. A positive statistically significant association between self-reported childhood sexual abuse and transactional sex was identified (OR: 3.45; 95% CI: 1.71 – 6.98), illustrating that those who experienced any type of child sexual abuse had a 3.5 times as likely to report transactional sex compared to those who did not experience sexual abuse during childhood. Childhood sexual abuse was also significantly associated with substance use before sexual activity (OR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.11 – 3.34). The study findings suggests a need for further research to understand the long term effects of child sexual abuse. Further, future public health interventions aimed at reducing sexual abuse and violence inflicted on South African children should be employed as means to improve their wellbeing in adulthood.