Project Title

Impact of Interprofessional Healthcare Student Teams at a Remote Area Medical Event in Rural Appalachia

Authors' Affiliations

Sean Vinh, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Rebecca Maloney, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Addison Lawson, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Dr. Emily Flores, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Clinch Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

170

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Pharmacy Practice

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Emily Flores

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Pharmacy Student

Project's Category

Other Education, Health of Underserved Populations, Rural Health

Abstract Text

Interprofessional collaboration in healthcare is vital to the nation’s health and interprofessional education is of significant interest in the current academic climate and practice environment. Remote Area Medical is a non-profit healthcare organization that partners with community hosts to provide dental, vision, and medical services to medically underserved patients in remote areas of the United States and abroad. RAM mobile clinics have served over 785,000 people since their founding in 1985, providing vital healthcare services free of charge through the volunteer services of healthcare professionals. RAM mobile clinics provide an excellent opportunity for interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education as learners partner with volunteer professionals to serve the community. The RAM mobile clinic in Gray, Tennessee was first established in 2017 and implemented the innovate utilization of undergraduate and graduate health professional students from the East Tennessee State University Academic Health Sciences Center in student teams. Interprofessional student teams along with precepting faculty are flexible in location and services offered to best serve the needs of the mobile clinic at any given time. Interprofessional student teams work to improve patient utilization of services offered at the event and assist with medication histories and health screens while growing student interprofessional patient care skills in the process. The objective of this research is to describe the impact of interprofessional student teams on patient care at the Gray, Tennessee RAM mobile clinic during the first two years. Data was collected from the years 2017 and 2018 by the student volunteer coordinator then analyzed by student researchers. The interprofessional student teams consisted of 87 student volunteers that were training in Clinical and Rehabilitative Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Public Health, or Pharmacy over the course of the three-day mobile clinic in 2017 and 109 different student volunteers in 2018. Student teams were precepted by interprofessional faculty and logged 2,332 interventions in 2017 and 1,130 interventions in 2018. The top two interventions in 2017 were Medication Histories and Blood Glucose Screens while the top two interventions in 2018 were Medication Histories and Health Screens. Variation in number of interventions logged and type of interventions logged can be explained by event characteristics that differed between the two years. Student participants commented positively on their engagement with one another and discussions they had to better understand each other’s professions between patient encounters. This research attempts to demonstrate that the impact of interprofessional student teams at a RAM mobile clinic is worth the investment of faculty resources in planning and execution to engage student learning while benefitting the patient population being served. This research also provided a hypothesis for additional research to be conducted around the 2019 Gray, Tennessee RAM mobile clinic.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Impact of Interprofessional Healthcare Student Teams at a Remote Area Medical Event in Rural Appalachia

Clinch Mtn

Interprofessional collaboration in healthcare is vital to the nation’s health and interprofessional education is of significant interest in the current academic climate and practice environment. Remote Area Medical is a non-profit healthcare organization that partners with community hosts to provide dental, vision, and medical services to medically underserved patients in remote areas of the United States and abroad. RAM mobile clinics have served over 785,000 people since their founding in 1985, providing vital healthcare services free of charge through the volunteer services of healthcare professionals. RAM mobile clinics provide an excellent opportunity for interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education as learners partner with volunteer professionals to serve the community. The RAM mobile clinic in Gray, Tennessee was first established in 2017 and implemented the innovate utilization of undergraduate and graduate health professional students from the East Tennessee State University Academic Health Sciences Center in student teams. Interprofessional student teams along with precepting faculty are flexible in location and services offered to best serve the needs of the mobile clinic at any given time. Interprofessional student teams work to improve patient utilization of services offered at the event and assist with medication histories and health screens while growing student interprofessional patient care skills in the process. The objective of this research is to describe the impact of interprofessional student teams on patient care at the Gray, Tennessee RAM mobile clinic during the first two years. Data was collected from the years 2017 and 2018 by the student volunteer coordinator then analyzed by student researchers. The interprofessional student teams consisted of 87 student volunteers that were training in Clinical and Rehabilitative Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Public Health, or Pharmacy over the course of the three-day mobile clinic in 2017 and 109 different student volunteers in 2018. Student teams were precepted by interprofessional faculty and logged 2,332 interventions in 2017 and 1,130 interventions in 2018. The top two interventions in 2017 were Medication Histories and Blood Glucose Screens while the top two interventions in 2018 were Medication Histories and Health Screens. Variation in number of interventions logged and type of interventions logged can be explained by event characteristics that differed between the two years. Student participants commented positively on their engagement with one another and discussions they had to better understand each other’s professions between patient encounters. This research attempts to demonstrate that the impact of interprofessional student teams at a RAM mobile clinic is worth the investment of faculty resources in planning and execution to engage student learning while benefitting the patient population being served. This research also provided a hypothesis for additional research to be conducted around the 2019 Gray, Tennessee RAM mobile clinic.