Project Title

Observing the Connection Between the Religious Support Perceived by Children and the Number of Adverse Childhood Experiences Faced

Authors' Affiliations

Tayla Sluss, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Diana Morelen, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

72

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Psychology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Diana Morelen

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Psychology

Abstract Text

Children naturally seek support and comfort from birth on, especially when faced with negative life events. Support that comes from the primary care givers is necessary and useful but is not always available or the only considerably influential support the child receives. Other places support could come from include peers, school resources or religious resources and beyond. Religion and the support received from faith-based groups has been used in many ways to aid in coping with experienced trauma and times of adversity. Observing the perceived religious support that children feel they have allows for the support systems in a child’s life to understand the potentially useful practices in the resilience of adverse experiences faced by youth. Focusing on the relationship between how much religious support is perceived and the number of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) scores could lead to further research endeavors on religiosity’s role in coping with trauma and adversity. It is hypothesized that the more religious socialization support perceived by participants as children, the fewer ACE scores will be reported. Data collected from the REACH (Religion, Emotions, and Current Health) survey style study of the ARCH (Affect, Regulation, Coping and Health) research lab will be used. The college aged participant’s (N = 766) responses on reflective views of support perceived during youth in faith communities using the ARCH lab adapted version Faith Activities in the Home scale (FAITHS; Lambert & Dollahite, 2010) and number of ACEs will be analyzed. The proposed analysis to be conducted is a Pearson’s r correlation using SPSS. It is expected that there will be a negative correlation where the more religious support that is perceived during childhood, the fewer ACEs will be reported. Previous research has not directly observed the relationship of retrospective religious support and ACEs, so this study could direct to new investigations of coping through religious support for children. If the results are not statistically significant, past perceived religious support may not affect ACEs directly, and would lead to other ways of investigating the relationship of coping through religious means during adverse experiences.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Observing the Connection Between the Religious Support Perceived by Children and the Number of Adverse Childhood Experiences Faced

Ballroom

Children naturally seek support and comfort from birth on, especially when faced with negative life events. Support that comes from the primary care givers is necessary and useful but is not always available or the only considerably influential support the child receives. Other places support could come from include peers, school resources or religious resources and beyond. Religion and the support received from faith-based groups has been used in many ways to aid in coping with experienced trauma and times of adversity. Observing the perceived religious support that children feel they have allows for the support systems in a child’s life to understand the potentially useful practices in the resilience of adverse experiences faced by youth. Focusing on the relationship between how much religious support is perceived and the number of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) scores could lead to further research endeavors on religiosity’s role in coping with trauma and adversity. It is hypothesized that the more religious socialization support perceived by participants as children, the fewer ACE scores will be reported. Data collected from the REACH (Religion, Emotions, and Current Health) survey style study of the ARCH (Affect, Regulation, Coping and Health) research lab will be used. The college aged participant’s (N = 766) responses on reflective views of support perceived during youth in faith communities using the ARCH lab adapted version Faith Activities in the Home scale (FAITHS; Lambert & Dollahite, 2010) and number of ACEs will be analyzed. The proposed analysis to be conducted is a Pearson’s r correlation using SPSS. It is expected that there will be a negative correlation where the more religious support that is perceived during childhood, the fewer ACEs will be reported. Previous research has not directly observed the relationship of retrospective religious support and ACEs, so this study could direct to new investigations of coping through religious support for children. If the results are not statistically significant, past perceived religious support may not affect ACEs directly, and would lead to other ways of investigating the relationship of coping through religious means during adverse experiences.