Project Title

Error-related Negativity and Feedback-related Negativity on a Reinforcement Learning Task

Authors' Affiliations

Elizabeth Ridley, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Marissa Jones, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Ethan Ashworth, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Dr. Eric Sellers, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

56

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Psychology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Eric Sellers

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Psychology

Abstract Text

The measurement of electrical activity at the scalp using EEG can provide great insight into cognition and information processing. For example, event-related potentials (ERPs) are positive or negative deflections that correspond to a stimulus or event. These ERPs can reflect error processing and attentional processes associated with a stimulus. Specifically, error-related negativity and feedback-related negativity (ERN, FRN), are related to performance/conflict monitoring. Furthermore, the P300 ERP reflects attentional processes in response to target stimuli. Previous research examining the P300 component on a complex learning task has demonstrated increased P300 amplitude in response to violations of participants’ expectations about task events. The current study extends this research by examining ERN and FRN amplitudes on trials with incorrect behavioral responses throughout the same learning task. Pilot data has been collected from four participants. Participants wore an electrode cap with 32 electrodes to record EEG data while completing a paired associate task. Pilot data has demonstrated an increased ERN amplitude 50ms after error commission on incorrect trials. The ERN and FRN amplitudes were greater for incorrect trials than for correct trials. Larger P300 amplitudes were also observed for the incorrect trials than for the correct trials. This extension upon previous findings provides further insight into the role of performance monitoring and error processing in learning.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Error-related Negativity and Feedback-related Negativity on a Reinforcement Learning Task

Ballroom

The measurement of electrical activity at the scalp using EEG can provide great insight into cognition and information processing. For example, event-related potentials (ERPs) are positive or negative deflections that correspond to a stimulus or event. These ERPs can reflect error processing and attentional processes associated with a stimulus. Specifically, error-related negativity and feedback-related negativity (ERN, FRN), are related to performance/conflict monitoring. Furthermore, the P300 ERP reflects attentional processes in response to target stimuli. Previous research examining the P300 component on a complex learning task has demonstrated increased P300 amplitude in response to violations of participants’ expectations about task events. The current study extends this research by examining ERN and FRN amplitudes on trials with incorrect behavioral responses throughout the same learning task. Pilot data has been collected from four participants. Participants wore an electrode cap with 32 electrodes to record EEG data while completing a paired associate task. Pilot data has demonstrated an increased ERN amplitude 50ms after error commission on incorrect trials. The ERN and FRN amplitudes were greater for incorrect trials than for correct trials. Larger P300 amplitudes were also observed for the incorrect trials than for the correct trials. This extension upon previous findings provides further insight into the role of performance monitoring and error processing in learning.