Project Title

An association between smoking status and homocysteine levels and whether this association is modified by sex hormones and cholesterol.

Authors' Affiliations

Manul Awasthi, Department of Health Services Management and Policy, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Ogbebor Enaholo Omoike, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Timir Kumar Paul, Division of Cardiology, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Stanley Lee Ridner, College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Hadii Mohammed Mamudu, Department of Health Services Management and Policy, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

101

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Services Management & Policy

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Hadii Mamudu

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Cardiovascular System, Public Health

Abstract Text

Background/objective: Environmental and dietary exposures alter the levels of homocysteine in the human body; little is known about the effect of smoking status on homocysteine levels. This study aimed to examine the effect of smoking status on homocysteine levels and to determine if the association is modified by estradiol and cholesterol.

Methods: National representative data (n=4,580) were obtained for adults aged ≥20 years. The outcome was homocysteine and exposure was smoking status, categorized as current, former or never smoker. Current smoker defined as a person who smoked ≥100 cigarettes in their lifetime and at least once in the last month; former smoker- one who had smoked ≥100 cigarettes and had quit smoking at the time of the interview; never smoker- adult who never smoked cigarettes in their lifetime. General linear models (GLM) were used to examine the associations between smoking status and homocysteine levels; while assessing the impact of estradiol and cholesterol. Estradiol was stratified as low (/ml), normal (10-40 pg/mL), and high (>40 pg/ml). Cholesterol- stratified as normal (<200mg/dl) or high (≥200mg/dl).

Results: Adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, education, and income level, smoking status was associated with the levels of serum homocysteine using unadjusted GLM (p0.05). Adjusting for multiple comparisons using Tukey’s method, there were statistically significant differences between former smokers and never smokers (p

Conclusion: Homocysteine levels were found to vary among smoking strata. Statistically significant differences exist between former smokers and never smokers. Former smokers may be more prone to having risk factors of elevated homocysteine levels compared to never and current smokers, putting them at risk of cerebrovascular accidents and acute coronary syndromes. These findings suggest that it is vital for people not to initiate smoking.

Keywords: Smoking, Homocysteine, Sex hormones, Estradiol, Cholesterol.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

An association between smoking status and homocysteine levels and whether this association is modified by sex hormones and cholesterol.

White Top Mtn

Background/objective: Environmental and dietary exposures alter the levels of homocysteine in the human body; little is known about the effect of smoking status on homocysteine levels. This study aimed to examine the effect of smoking status on homocysteine levels and to determine if the association is modified by estradiol and cholesterol.

Methods: National representative data (n=4,580) were obtained for adults aged ≥20 years. The outcome was homocysteine and exposure was smoking status, categorized as current, former or never smoker. Current smoker defined as a person who smoked ≥100 cigarettes in their lifetime and at least once in the last month; former smoker- one who had smoked ≥100 cigarettes and had quit smoking at the time of the interview; never smoker- adult who never smoked cigarettes in their lifetime. General linear models (GLM) were used to examine the associations between smoking status and homocysteine levels; while assessing the impact of estradiol and cholesterol. Estradiol was stratified as low (/ml), normal (10-40 pg/mL), and high (>40 pg/ml). Cholesterol- stratified as normal (<200mg/dl) or high (≥200mg/dl).

Results: Adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, education, and income level, smoking status was associated with the levels of serum homocysteine using unadjusted GLM (p0.05). Adjusting for multiple comparisons using Tukey’s method, there were statistically significant differences between former smokers and never smokers (p

Conclusion: Homocysteine levels were found to vary among smoking strata. Statistically significant differences exist between former smokers and never smokers. Former smokers may be more prone to having risk factors of elevated homocysteine levels compared to never and current smokers, putting them at risk of cerebrovascular accidents and acute coronary syndromes. These findings suggest that it is vital for people not to initiate smoking.

Keywords: Smoking, Homocysteine, Sex hormones, Estradiol, Cholesterol.