Project Title

Factors Influencing Attitude Towards The Use of Mosquito Nets in Households in The Gambia

Authors' Affiliations

Muhammed Jawla, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee state University, Johnson City, TN. Folawiyo S Olanrewaju, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee state University, Johnson City, TN. Megan Quinn, Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee state University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

107

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Biostatistics & Epidemiology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Megan Quinn

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Public Health, International Health, Infectious Diseases

Abstract Text

Malaria is caused by Plasmodium parasites, which are transmitted via the bite of infected female anopheles mosquitoes. There were 217 million cases of malaria worldwide, and about 435,000 malaria related deaths in 2017. WHO Africa region accounted for 92% and 93% of malaria cases and deaths worldwide. According to The Gambia National Malaria Strategic Plan 2013-2020, malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing attitude towards the use of mosquito nets in households in The Gambia using Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data. The current study is a secondary data analysis with a, cross-sectional study design. The source of the data for this study is the DHS, which was conducted by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) together with the Gambia Bureau of Statistics (GBOS) in 2013. The study sample is representative of The Gambian population. The sample size for the study was 5276 subjects. Statistical Analysis System (SAS 9.3) was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics were generated for the factors been tested. These included area of residence, presence of electricity, indoor residual spraying, highest level of education and wealth index. The outcome variable measured was household use of mosquito nets (Yes/No). Logistic regression analysis was done to determine whether area of residence, wealth index, education level, presence of electricity and indoor residual spraying influence attitude towards use of mosquito nets in households. Stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the final model with the most significant predictors. Odds ratios and corresponding confidence intervals were reported. Most of the study participants were poor (46%). Those with no education made up 45.5% of the study population and 58% of dwellings had no indoor residual spraying done in the past year. 76.6% and 59.1% of respondents lived in households that had at least one mosquito net and no electricity supply, respectively. 50.6% of the respondents resided in rural areas. Logistic regression analysis showed that wealth index, indoor residual spraying and area of residence were significant factors (p<0.05) influencing attitude towards use of mosquito nets in households. Indoor residual spraying (OR=2.00; 95% C.I. 1.71-2.36), primary school education (OR=1.1; 95% C.I. 0.94-1.32), middle class wealth index (OR=1.32; 95% C.I. 1.05-1.67) and rural residence (OR=1.29; 95% C.I. 1.01-1.64) are all independent factors that increased likelihood of mosquito net usage in households. Identifying factors that influence the usage of mosquito nets in households, can be useful in developing target interventions to further reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in The Gambia. Knowledge from this study can be used to further strengthen the national malaria strategic plan. To further establish causality and increase strength of association between factors and outcome, a case control or cohort study design will be needed, since that is one of the limitations of a cross sectional study.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Factors Influencing Attitude Towards The Use of Mosquito Nets in Households in The Gambia

White Top Mtn

Malaria is caused by Plasmodium parasites, which are transmitted via the bite of infected female anopheles mosquitoes. There were 217 million cases of malaria worldwide, and about 435,000 malaria related deaths in 2017. WHO Africa region accounted for 92% and 93% of malaria cases and deaths worldwide. According to The Gambia National Malaria Strategic Plan 2013-2020, malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing attitude towards the use of mosquito nets in households in The Gambia using Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data. The current study is a secondary data analysis with a, cross-sectional study design. The source of the data for this study is the DHS, which was conducted by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) together with the Gambia Bureau of Statistics (GBOS) in 2013. The study sample is representative of The Gambian population. The sample size for the study was 5276 subjects. Statistical Analysis System (SAS 9.3) was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics were generated for the factors been tested. These included area of residence, presence of electricity, indoor residual spraying, highest level of education and wealth index. The outcome variable measured was household use of mosquito nets (Yes/No). Logistic regression analysis was done to determine whether area of residence, wealth index, education level, presence of electricity and indoor residual spraying influence attitude towards use of mosquito nets in households. Stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the final model with the most significant predictors. Odds ratios and corresponding confidence intervals were reported. Most of the study participants were poor (46%). Those with no education made up 45.5% of the study population and 58% of dwellings had no indoor residual spraying done in the past year. 76.6% and 59.1% of respondents lived in households that had at least one mosquito net and no electricity supply, respectively. 50.6% of the respondents resided in rural areas. Logistic regression analysis showed that wealth index, indoor residual spraying and area of residence were significant factors (p<0.05) influencing attitude towards use of mosquito nets in households. Indoor residual spraying (OR=2.00; 95% C.I. 1.71-2.36), primary school education (OR=1.1; 95% C.I. 0.94-1.32), middle class wealth index (OR=1.32; 95% C.I. 1.05-1.67) and rural residence (OR=1.29; 95% C.I. 1.01-1.64) are all independent factors that increased likelihood of mosquito net usage in households. Identifying factors that influence the usage of mosquito nets in households, can be useful in developing target interventions to further reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in The Gambia. Knowledge from this study can be used to further strengthen the national malaria strategic plan. To further establish causality and increase strength of association between factors and outcome, a case control or cohort study design will be needed, since that is one of the limitations of a cross sectional study.