Project Title

Effects of an Electronic Schedule on Independence for a Student with sever disabilities

Authors' Affiliations

Ashwag Alghamdi; Dr. Pamela Mims, Dr. James Fox, and Dr. Lori Marks, Department of Special Education, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee. Ashwag Alghamdi is the first author and the person completing the registration.

Location

Clinch Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

158

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Educational Foundations & Special Education

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Pamela Mims

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Other Education

Abstract Text

Students with disabilities often face difficulty throughout their lives. One of these common challenges for students with severe disabilities is they often struggle with routine skills — for example, significant time spent helping students transition to activities throughout the day. The student's performance to complete required daily school routines increased when the researcher applied the picture activity schedules. Also, one strategy to enable students with disabilities to increase independence is through assistive technology. Therefore, many studies support the use of technology-based visual supports to teach daily school routines. Teachers increasingly have started to adopt an electronic visual activity schedule (eVAS) as a means to provide clear and consistent support for students with disabilities. Although the above studies are positive, there is still a need to more fully examine the various outcomes of eVAS. Therefore, this study is to investigate the effects of using eVAS (i.e., FIRST THEN application) on the latency period that the student spends for checking the schedule independently and prompts needed to transition throughout the day. Also, the value that the teacher and student place on the use of an eVAS to teach daily life and school routines instead of using typical instruction (e.g., traditional visual schedule), and the student’s ability to generalize the use of the eVAS across instructors and materials (display). The participant was a 10-year-old male in the fifth grade with intellectual disability and autism. This study was conducted in an intermediate school in the southeastern United States. An ABAB single case design was used to investigate the effects of the app. The dependent variables (DV) included: 1) The percent of independent correct responding to the natural cue “timer went off, or the teacher said: “Time to Switch”; 2) The amount of time the participant took to respond to the natural cue and check a schedule. The independent variable (IV) was applying the system of least prompts (SLP) along with the First Then application on iPad. Both DV and IV were collected five sessions in five days, during the transition period between activities in each baseline, intervention, maintenance, and generalization phases. The second observer recorded 25% of the data collection of the inter-observer agreement and procedural fidelity. By the end of the study, the social validity survey was provided one for the teacher and another one for the participant. The result indicated a functional relation between DV and the IV. Also, the limitation and the suggestion for future research were discussed. In conclusion, this study extended the result of prior studies by emphasizing the effectiveness of using the eVAS with students to independently complete the routine skills and applying SLP to give the student the opportunity to do the task with less prompts. The study will guide teachers use of such support tool and apply the intervention in the classroom with students with disabilities.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Effects of an Electronic Schedule on Independence for a Student with sever disabilities

Clinch Mtn

Students with disabilities often face difficulty throughout their lives. One of these common challenges for students with severe disabilities is they often struggle with routine skills — for example, significant time spent helping students transition to activities throughout the day. The student's performance to complete required daily school routines increased when the researcher applied the picture activity schedules. Also, one strategy to enable students with disabilities to increase independence is through assistive technology. Therefore, many studies support the use of technology-based visual supports to teach daily school routines. Teachers increasingly have started to adopt an electronic visual activity schedule (eVAS) as a means to provide clear and consistent support for students with disabilities. Although the above studies are positive, there is still a need to more fully examine the various outcomes of eVAS. Therefore, this study is to investigate the effects of using eVAS (i.e., FIRST THEN application) on the latency period that the student spends for checking the schedule independently and prompts needed to transition throughout the day. Also, the value that the teacher and student place on the use of an eVAS to teach daily life and school routines instead of using typical instruction (e.g., traditional visual schedule), and the student’s ability to generalize the use of the eVAS across instructors and materials (display). The participant was a 10-year-old male in the fifth grade with intellectual disability and autism. This study was conducted in an intermediate school in the southeastern United States. An ABAB single case design was used to investigate the effects of the app. The dependent variables (DV) included: 1) The percent of independent correct responding to the natural cue “timer went off, or the teacher said: “Time to Switch”; 2) The amount of time the participant took to respond to the natural cue and check a schedule. The independent variable (IV) was applying the system of least prompts (SLP) along with the First Then application on iPad. Both DV and IV were collected five sessions in five days, during the transition period between activities in each baseline, intervention, maintenance, and generalization phases. The second observer recorded 25% of the data collection of the inter-observer agreement and procedural fidelity. By the end of the study, the social validity survey was provided one for the teacher and another one for the participant. The result indicated a functional relation between DV and the IV. Also, the limitation and the suggestion for future research were discussed. In conclusion, this study extended the result of prior studies by emphasizing the effectiveness of using the eVAS with students to independently complete the routine skills and applying SLP to give the student the opportunity to do the task with less prompts. The study will guide teachers use of such support tool and apply the intervention in the classroom with students with disabilities.