Project Title

Effect of Sepsis on Circulating CTRP3 Levels

Authors' Affiliations

Adam Musick, Department of Health Sciences, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Madison Shipley, Department of Health Sciences, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Fei Tu, Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Chuanfu Li, Division of Surgical Research, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Valentin Yakubenko, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Jonathan Peterson, Department of Health Sciences, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

124

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Jonathan Peterson

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Endocrine System, Immune System

Abstract Text

Effect of Sepsis on Circulating CTRP3 Levels

Adam Musick, Madison Shipley, Fei Tu, Chuanfu Li, Valentin Yakubenko, and Jonathan M. Peterson.

Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ which secrets several pro- and anti- inflammatory mediators, collectively called adipokines. Our previous work has identified a novel anti-inflammatory adipokine called C1q TNF Related Protein 3 (CTRP3). Others have previously demonstrated that localized overexpression of CTRP3 protects myocardial tissue from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis, further supporting the potential protective role of CTRP3. However, endogenous regulation of CTRP3 in response to a sepsis event has not been explored. Further, other adipokines have been identified as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for critically ill patients. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to determine the effects of a sepsis event on the circulating CTRP3 levels. METHODS: Gonadal adipose tissue and serum were collected 8 hours after induction of the cecal-puncture and ligation (CLP) model of sepsis or sham control mice. The circulating levels of CTRP3 were quantified by immunoblot analysis. The transcription levels of CTRP3 in adipose tissue were measured by Real-Time PCR. In addition, to explore a potential mechanism for a protective role of CTRP3, thioglycollate-induced peritoneal macrophages were isolated and binding of recombinant CTRP3 was determined by imaging flow cytometry. RESULTS: Circulating CTRP3 levels decreased by approximately 90% compared to sham mice. However, adipose tissue transcription levels of CTRP3 was not difference between CLP and sham mice. Further, imaging flow cytometry demonstrated that CTRP3 binds directly to isolated macrophages. CONCLUSION: The overserved reduction in circulating CTRP3 protein levels and the absence of changes to the CTRP3 transcription, indicate that during sepsis CTRP3 is actively removed from the blood. As CTRP3 binds directly to macrophages and has been previously shown to attenuate LPS-induced macrophage activation these data could indicate that under normal conditions CTRP3 combines with active macrophages to help suppress cytokine overexpression. However, it appears that during sepsis the endogenous CTRP3 levels are quickly depleted. Combine these data support future research to determine if circulating CTRP3 levels are a biomarker indicative of sepsis prognosis and to determine if increasing the circulating levels of CTRP3 could reduce the cytokine storm associated to a sepsis event. Further, as we have demonstrated CTRP3 binds directly to macrophages, future studies are also needed to explore the potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CTRP3 action on macrophages.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Effect of Sepsis on Circulating CTRP3 Levels

White Top Mtn

Effect of Sepsis on Circulating CTRP3 Levels

Adam Musick, Madison Shipley, Fei Tu, Chuanfu Li, Valentin Yakubenko, and Jonathan M. Peterson.

Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ which secrets several pro- and anti- inflammatory mediators, collectively called adipokines. Our previous work has identified a novel anti-inflammatory adipokine called C1q TNF Related Protein 3 (CTRP3). Others have previously demonstrated that localized overexpression of CTRP3 protects myocardial tissue from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis, further supporting the potential protective role of CTRP3. However, endogenous regulation of CTRP3 in response to a sepsis event has not been explored. Further, other adipokines have been identified as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for critically ill patients. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to determine the effects of a sepsis event on the circulating CTRP3 levels. METHODS: Gonadal adipose tissue and serum were collected 8 hours after induction of the cecal-puncture and ligation (CLP) model of sepsis or sham control mice. The circulating levels of CTRP3 were quantified by immunoblot analysis. The transcription levels of CTRP3 in adipose tissue were measured by Real-Time PCR. In addition, to explore a potential mechanism for a protective role of CTRP3, thioglycollate-induced peritoneal macrophages were isolated and binding of recombinant CTRP3 was determined by imaging flow cytometry. RESULTS: Circulating CTRP3 levels decreased by approximately 90% compared to sham mice. However, adipose tissue transcription levels of CTRP3 was not difference between CLP and sham mice. Further, imaging flow cytometry demonstrated that CTRP3 binds directly to isolated macrophages. CONCLUSION: The overserved reduction in circulating CTRP3 protein levels and the absence of changes to the CTRP3 transcription, indicate that during sepsis CTRP3 is actively removed from the blood. As CTRP3 binds directly to macrophages and has been previously shown to attenuate LPS-induced macrophage activation these data could indicate that under normal conditions CTRP3 combines with active macrophages to help suppress cytokine overexpression. However, it appears that during sepsis the endogenous CTRP3 levels are quickly depleted. Combine these data support future research to determine if circulating CTRP3 levels are a biomarker indicative of sepsis prognosis and to determine if increasing the circulating levels of CTRP3 could reduce the cytokine storm associated to a sepsis event. Further, as we have demonstrated CTRP3 binds directly to macrophages, future studies are also needed to explore the potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CTRP3 action on macrophages.