Project Title

Effects of Self-Care on Undergraduate Stress

Authors' Affiliations

Gabriel Simerly, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Ginette Blackhart, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Parker Dreves, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Robin Leonard, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

71

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Psychology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Ginette Blackhart

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Psychology

Abstract Text

Previous research has shown that excessive levels of stress can have a significant, negative effect on one’s overall cognitive efficiency and that stress levels are negatively correlated with various self-care practices. The present research was designed to build upon this body of knowledge by gathering data from an undergraduate sample (N = 200) with 44 males and 156 females (MAge = 21.22). Participants’ stress levels and self-care practices were measured at weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 of a standard semester using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and the Mindful Self-Care Scale. We hypothesized that increased stress would result in decreased self-care practices and that predisposed levels of self-care at time 1 could be used to predict stress levels at times 3 and 5. A cross-lagged panel analysis supported this hypothesis, indicating simultaneously that self-care was significantly correlated with stress and that the two factors were significantly predictive of one another at later time points.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Effects of Self-Care on Undergraduate Stress

Ballroom

Previous research has shown that excessive levels of stress can have a significant, negative effect on one’s overall cognitive efficiency and that stress levels are negatively correlated with various self-care practices. The present research was designed to build upon this body of knowledge by gathering data from an undergraduate sample (N = 200) with 44 males and 156 females (MAge = 21.22). Participants’ stress levels and self-care practices were measured at weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 of a standard semester using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and the Mindful Self-Care Scale. We hypothesized that increased stress would result in decreased self-care practices and that predisposed levels of self-care at time 1 could be used to predict stress levels at times 3 and 5. A cross-lagged panel analysis supported this hypothesis, indicating simultaneously that self-care was significantly correlated with stress and that the two factors were significantly predictive of one another at later time points.