Project Title

Investigation into Characteristics of Bench Press using PUSH™ Band

Authors' Affiliations

Avery Peters, Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, Clemmer College of Education, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Kimitake Sato, Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

114

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Sport, Exercise, Recreation & Kinesiology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kimitake Sato

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Public Health, Health Physics

Abstract Text

Abstract

Investigation into Characteristics of Bench Press using PUSH™ Band

Peters, Avery1 and Sato, Kimitake1

Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN1

Introduction: Sport scientist and strength coaches use resistance training to increase athletic performance and muscle hypertrophy. Improving muscular strength is the most essential task for these scientists, however, how best to identify weakness has yet to be established. The popularity of velocity-based resistance training has recently increased as a method to prescribe resistance training intensity, therefore, the purpose of the study was to identify the characteristics of bench press concentric velocity. It is hypothesized that the velocity output will decrease during the change from the 75% relative load of the 1RM to the 85% relative load of 1RM. It is believed that there will be a greater output of velocity during the 75% set than the 85% set. Methods: Nine female collegiate athletes (18-21 yrs), participated in this study. PUSH™ bands were used to measure barbell velocity during the bench press exercise. Each female was expected to preform 3 sets of 5 repetitions (3x5) at an intensity of 75% and 85% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Only data from repetition 2-4 were used for analysis. Results: The results drawn from data collected supported our hypothesis showing a decrease in velocity among the 85% 1RM test when compared to the 75% 1RM test group. Comparisons were drawn using a t-Test table comprised of PUSH™ Band data. Conclusion: The results supported the hypothesis that this type of technology can identify the load specific velocity to help strength coaches to identify the optimal resistance for certain training program and goals by using collected data with the PUSH™ Band to identify weakness in strength and/or endurance.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Investigation into Characteristics of Bench Press using PUSH™ Band

White Top Mtn

Abstract

Investigation into Characteristics of Bench Press using PUSH™ Band

Peters, Avery1 and Sato, Kimitake1

Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN1

Introduction: Sport scientist and strength coaches use resistance training to increase athletic performance and muscle hypertrophy. Improving muscular strength is the most essential task for these scientists, however, how best to identify weakness has yet to be established. The popularity of velocity-based resistance training has recently increased as a method to prescribe resistance training intensity, therefore, the purpose of the study was to identify the characteristics of bench press concentric velocity. It is hypothesized that the velocity output will decrease during the change from the 75% relative load of the 1RM to the 85% relative load of 1RM. It is believed that there will be a greater output of velocity during the 75% set than the 85% set. Methods: Nine female collegiate athletes (18-21 yrs), participated in this study. PUSH™ bands were used to measure barbell velocity during the bench press exercise. Each female was expected to preform 3 sets of 5 repetitions (3x5) at an intensity of 75% and 85% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Only data from repetition 2-4 were used for analysis. Results: The results drawn from data collected supported our hypothesis showing a decrease in velocity among the 85% 1RM test when compared to the 75% 1RM test group. Comparisons were drawn using a t-Test table comprised of PUSH™ Band data. Conclusion: The results supported the hypothesis that this type of technology can identify the load specific velocity to help strength coaches to identify the optimal resistance for certain training program and goals by using collected data with the PUSH™ Band to identify weakness in strength and/or endurance.