Project Title

Domestic Violence Survivor-Offender Relationship is Related to Type of Abuse Sustained

Authors' Affiliations

Rachel Carpenter MS, Department of Clinical Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Alyssa Gretak MA, Department of Clinical Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Lydia Eisenbrandt MA, Department of Clinical Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Rebecca Gilley, Department of Clinical Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Jill Stinson PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:20 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 9:35 AM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Psychology

Clinical Psychology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Jill Stinson

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences

Abstract Text

In the past decade, the increasing prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and domestic violence (DV) on college and university campuses has been given considerable attention. This abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and coercive control, often leads to impairment in victims (Ross, 2017; Straus, Gelles & Steinmetz). While the overall rates of IPV and DV have been relatively well-studied on college campuses, the differential impact of survivor-offender relationship on type of abuse has not been fully examined. As a result, there may be important correlates between survivor-offender relationship and the nature of abusive acts.

Data for this project were obtained from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation’s online incident-based reporting system. Reported incidents of DV/IPV in 2017 were examined in the current analysis with variables divided by survivor-offender relationship and type of abuse. Survivor- offender relationship included intimate, acquaintance, stranger, and family, while types of abuse included kidnapping, incest, forcible rape and statutory rape, aggravated assault, simple assault, murder, intimidation stalking, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.

A preliminary χ2 16 x 4 contingency table illustrated a significant difference between survivor-offender relationship and type of abuse χ2(33) = 185.43, p <.001, with a significant difference between relationship and offense types. Further analyses indicated higher rates of simple assault in intimate relationships compared to acquaintances and forcible rape proving more evident in acquaintances compared to intimate relationships. Interestingly, intimidation was higher in African Americans acquaintances compared to Caucasian individuals’ where intimidation was more evident in intimate relationships. Further analyses will investigate specific racial and ethnic breakdowns, gender considerations, and the influence and possession of a firearm. To our knowledge, this area of research on college campuses has not examined the lethality and influence of a firearm, types of injury, and the survivor-offender relationship.

Few have theorized regarding DV/IPV and survivor-offender relationship and type of abuse, but the current findings are similar to research regarding characteristics of sexual assault survivors who present to the emergency room. For example, Logan, Cole and Capillo (2007) discovered that there is a difference in injury patterns depending on the survivor-offender relationship. With domestic violence being insidiously pervasive, this topic necessitates investigation due to research suggesting there are differences in mental health outcomes based on injuries sustained, and certain assault characteristics depending on the survivor-offender relationship (Culbertson & Dehle, 2001). Implications of the current study will be further discussed.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:20 AM Apr 12th, 9:35 AM

Domestic Violence Survivor-Offender Relationship is Related to Type of Abuse Sustained

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

In the past decade, the increasing prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and domestic violence (DV) on college and university campuses has been given considerable attention. This abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and coercive control, often leads to impairment in victims (Ross, 2017; Straus, Gelles & Steinmetz). While the overall rates of IPV and DV have been relatively well-studied on college campuses, the differential impact of survivor-offender relationship on type of abuse has not been fully examined. As a result, there may be important correlates between survivor-offender relationship and the nature of abusive acts.

Data for this project were obtained from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation’s online incident-based reporting system. Reported incidents of DV/IPV in 2017 were examined in the current analysis with variables divided by survivor-offender relationship and type of abuse. Survivor- offender relationship included intimate, acquaintance, stranger, and family, while types of abuse included kidnapping, incest, forcible rape and statutory rape, aggravated assault, simple assault, murder, intimidation stalking, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.

A preliminary χ2 16 x 4 contingency table illustrated a significant difference between survivor-offender relationship and type of abuse χ2(33) = 185.43, p <.001, with a significant difference between relationship and offense types. Further analyses indicated higher rates of simple assault in intimate relationships compared to acquaintances and forcible rape proving more evident in acquaintances compared to intimate relationships. Interestingly, intimidation was higher in African Americans acquaintances compared to Caucasian individuals’ where intimidation was more evident in intimate relationships. Further analyses will investigate specific racial and ethnic breakdowns, gender considerations, and the influence and possession of a firearm. To our knowledge, this area of research on college campuses has not examined the lethality and influence of a firearm, types of injury, and the survivor-offender relationship.

Few have theorized regarding DV/IPV and survivor-offender relationship and type of abuse, but the current findings are similar to research regarding characteristics of sexual assault survivors who present to the emergency room. For example, Logan, Cole and Capillo (2007) discovered that there is a difference in injury patterns depending on the survivor-offender relationship. With domestic violence being insidiously pervasive, this topic necessitates investigation due to research suggesting there are differences in mental health outcomes based on injuries sustained, and certain assault characteristics depending on the survivor-offender relationship (Culbertson & Dehle, 2001). Implications of the current study will be further discussed.