Project Title

Ruthenium Compounds for Photodynamic Chemotherapeutics and Solar Fuel Generation

Authors' Affiliations

Carter A. Delsorbo, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745 Annie B. McCullough, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745 Pau Piero' Vila, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745 Lyndsey Pulliam, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745 Alyssa Rojas, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745 Kayla M. Sager, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745 Dennis L. Ashford, Department of Natural Science, College of Science, Technology, and Math, Tusculum University, 60 Shiloh Rd. Greeneville, TN 37745

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

47

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Other - please list

Natural Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Dennis Ashford

Type

Poster: Non-Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Chemical Synthesis, Electrochemistry, Heterocyclic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Ligands, Organic Chemistry

Abstract Text

Ruthenium polypyridyl complexes have long been studied due to their unique photophysical characteristics and their synthetic accessibility. We report here the use of new ruthenium polypyridyl’s in photodynamic chemotherapeutic and solar fuel applications. Nearly half of all chemotherapeutics administered today are derived from platinum-based drugs (platins) which lack specificity and can cause sever side-effects. Photodynamic chemotherapeutics (PDT) circumvent these issues utilizing light activation at the site of cancerous cells to generate a cytotoxic Ru(II) center and eventually trigger cellular apoptosis. The new PDT pro-drugs presented push their metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) light absorption out into the near-IR which is able to penetrate skin at greater depths than traditional PDT drugs. New Ru(II) hydrogen fuel evolution catalyst for use in dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs) based off of the extensively explored octahedral tridentate-bidentate coordination motif is also investigated. In particular, pendant bases are oriented toward the active site of the catalyst to increase catalytic rates and lower overpotentials. Preliminary density functional theory calculations show that strategic placement of the pendant amine on the bidentate ligand allows for productive interactions between the base and the active site of the catalyst to evolve hydrogen.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Ruthenium Compounds for Photodynamic Chemotherapeutics and Solar Fuel Generation

Ballroom

Ruthenium polypyridyl complexes have long been studied due to their unique photophysical characteristics and their synthetic accessibility. We report here the use of new ruthenium polypyridyl’s in photodynamic chemotherapeutic and solar fuel applications. Nearly half of all chemotherapeutics administered today are derived from platinum-based drugs (platins) which lack specificity and can cause sever side-effects. Photodynamic chemotherapeutics (PDT) circumvent these issues utilizing light activation at the site of cancerous cells to generate a cytotoxic Ru(II) center and eventually trigger cellular apoptosis. The new PDT pro-drugs presented push their metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) light absorption out into the near-IR which is able to penetrate skin at greater depths than traditional PDT drugs. New Ru(II) hydrogen fuel evolution catalyst for use in dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs) based off of the extensively explored octahedral tridentate-bidentate coordination motif is also investigated. In particular, pendant bases are oriented toward the active site of the catalyst to increase catalytic rates and lower overpotentials. Preliminary density functional theory calculations show that strategic placement of the pendant amine on the bidentate ligand allows for productive interactions between the base and the active site of the catalyst to evolve hydrogen.