Project Title

Medical Scribes in a Family Medicine Residency Program: An Implementation Outcomes Study

Authors' Affiliations

Mary Catherine Rush, Department of Sociology and Anthropology and Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Todd Leibowitz DO, MSMS, Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Katherine Stone DO, Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Jodi Polaha PhD, Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Leigh Johnson MD, MPH, Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Chris Bridges, MD, Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

112

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Family Medicine

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Jodi Polaha

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Recent Graduate

Project's Category

Health Services Delivery, Health Care Cost Containment, Family Health Services

Abstract Text

The implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) has improved medical documentation in terms of accuracy, team communication, and ease of ordering tests and prescriptions; however, charting in an EHR strains the provider/patient relationship and contributes to physician burnout. Medical scribes are a promising potential solution to these problems. Our study aims to demonstrate that implementation of scribes into a medical residency program positively affects provider/patient satisfaction and improves quality and efficiency of EHR documentation. Our study evaluated the effectiveness and utility of scribes in a residency training program utilizing the established implementation framework “RE-AIM,” or Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation (quality), and Maintenance. During the study’s initial “Training Phase,” 11 first and second-year Family Medicine residents conducted scribe-facilitated patient visits. Patient and provider satisfaction ratings were collected, note quality was evaluated, and time to note closure was measured. During the subsequent “Choice Phase,” residents were given the option of whether to utilize scribes, and the same data measures were collected. Resident satisfaction ratings during the Training Phase showed an average score of 6.03 (on a 1-7 scale where “7” = “strongly agree” with positive statements), and a pilot sample of 9 patients showed an average patient satisfaction rating of 4.77 (on a 1-5 scale where “5” = “strongly agree” with positive statements). Scribe-facilitated notes coded for quality had an average score of 3.375 (on a 1-5 scale where 5 is “extremely” high quality). Finally, residents’ average time to note closure was decreased by more than 8 hours in scribe-facilitated visits. During the Choice Phase, all 11 participating residents requested scribe-facilitated visits, again with very high patient satisfaction scores (4.67 on a 1-5 scale) as well as high clinician satisfaction scores (6.06 on a 1-7 scale). Choice Phase note quality and note-closure time are currently being assessed. These results demonstrate that scribes improve clinician and patient satisfaction, as well as quality and efficiency of EHR documentation. Limitations include a small sample size of clinicians and patients. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes to determine whether scribes in a medical residency program represent a sustainable and effective intervention.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Medical Scribes in a Family Medicine Residency Program: An Implementation Outcomes Study

White Top Mtn

The implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) has improved medical documentation in terms of accuracy, team communication, and ease of ordering tests and prescriptions; however, charting in an EHR strains the provider/patient relationship and contributes to physician burnout. Medical scribes are a promising potential solution to these problems. Our study aims to demonstrate that implementation of scribes into a medical residency program positively affects provider/patient satisfaction and improves quality and efficiency of EHR documentation. Our study evaluated the effectiveness and utility of scribes in a residency training program utilizing the established implementation framework “RE-AIM,” or Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation (quality), and Maintenance. During the study’s initial “Training Phase,” 11 first and second-year Family Medicine residents conducted scribe-facilitated patient visits. Patient and provider satisfaction ratings were collected, note quality was evaluated, and time to note closure was measured. During the subsequent “Choice Phase,” residents were given the option of whether to utilize scribes, and the same data measures were collected. Resident satisfaction ratings during the Training Phase showed an average score of 6.03 (on a 1-7 scale where “7” = “strongly agree” with positive statements), and a pilot sample of 9 patients showed an average patient satisfaction rating of 4.77 (on a 1-5 scale where “5” = “strongly agree” with positive statements). Scribe-facilitated notes coded for quality had an average score of 3.375 (on a 1-5 scale where 5 is “extremely” high quality). Finally, residents’ average time to note closure was decreased by more than 8 hours in scribe-facilitated visits. During the Choice Phase, all 11 participating residents requested scribe-facilitated visits, again with very high patient satisfaction scores (4.67 on a 1-5 scale) as well as high clinician satisfaction scores (6.06 on a 1-7 scale). Choice Phase note quality and note-closure time are currently being assessed. These results demonstrate that scribes improve clinician and patient satisfaction, as well as quality and efficiency of EHR documentation. Limitations include a small sample size of clinicians and patients. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes to determine whether scribes in a medical residency program represent a sustainable and effective intervention.