Project Title

Completion of Type 2 Diabetes Comprehensive Care in a Federally Qualified Health Center in Rural Appalachia

Authors' Affiliations

Rebecca Maloney1, Addison Lawson1, Sean Vinh1, Justi Curry1, Dr. Tara Worley2, and Dr. Emily K. Flores1. 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University 2Rural Health Consortium, Rogersville, TN

Location

Clinch Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

169

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Pharmacy Practice

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Emily Flores

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Pharmacy Student

Project's Category

Medicine, Diseases, Healthcare

Abstract Text

Type 2 Diabetes affects approximately 30 million people across the Unites States. This chronic disease has significant effects on quality of life, and financial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Pharmacist intervention in addition to standard care for patients with Type 2 Diabetes has shown improved outcomes for patients; an essential aspect of these interventions is the completion of comprehensive care. Our objective is to identify the common missing components of comprehensive care to allow for development of targeted interventions and resources at the Rural Health Services Consortium. These findings may be implemented to improve the care of patients with diabetes in this clinic and others in similar clinics across the Appalachian region. Patients with Type 2 Diabetes who received their diabetes care at the Rural Health Consortium clinic in Rogersville, Tennessee were retrospectively evaluated for missing evidence-based interventions that could improve their health and quality of life, such as dental care, vaccinations, yearly diabetic foot exams, and eye exams. Completion of comprehensive care was calculated for patients enrolled in the site’s Diabetes Care Program for the year prior to their enrollment via retrospective chart review. A total of 28 patients were evaluated in this study from the Diabetes Care Program, a pharmacist-led diabetes care initiative designed to augment standard care, with the eventual goal of comparing this data to the year of enrollment in the program. IRB approval has been granted for this study. Preliminary results indicate consistent completion of evidence-based laboratory measurements, including lipid panels and hemoglobin A1C, and the initiation of appropriate medication therapy, such as ACE/ARBs, statins, Aspirin, and diabetic medications. However, age-appropriate and disease-specific vaccinations were less likely to be completed, and there was a lack of documentation for other critical health services, most notably dental care. This data will be implemented in future quality improvement measures for diabetic patients at the Rural Health Consortium and may serve as a model for other rural healthcare providers who serve diabetic patients.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Completion of Type 2 Diabetes Comprehensive Care in a Federally Qualified Health Center in Rural Appalachia

Clinch Mtn

Type 2 Diabetes affects approximately 30 million people across the Unites States. This chronic disease has significant effects on quality of life, and financial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Pharmacist intervention in addition to standard care for patients with Type 2 Diabetes has shown improved outcomes for patients; an essential aspect of these interventions is the completion of comprehensive care. Our objective is to identify the common missing components of comprehensive care to allow for development of targeted interventions and resources at the Rural Health Services Consortium. These findings may be implemented to improve the care of patients with diabetes in this clinic and others in similar clinics across the Appalachian region. Patients with Type 2 Diabetes who received their diabetes care at the Rural Health Consortium clinic in Rogersville, Tennessee were retrospectively evaluated for missing evidence-based interventions that could improve their health and quality of life, such as dental care, vaccinations, yearly diabetic foot exams, and eye exams. Completion of comprehensive care was calculated for patients enrolled in the site’s Diabetes Care Program for the year prior to their enrollment via retrospective chart review. A total of 28 patients were evaluated in this study from the Diabetes Care Program, a pharmacist-led diabetes care initiative designed to augment standard care, with the eventual goal of comparing this data to the year of enrollment in the program. IRB approval has been granted for this study. Preliminary results indicate consistent completion of evidence-based laboratory measurements, including lipid panels and hemoglobin A1C, and the initiation of appropriate medication therapy, such as ACE/ARBs, statins, Aspirin, and diabetic medications. However, age-appropriate and disease-specific vaccinations were less likely to be completed, and there was a lack of documentation for other critical health services, most notably dental care. This data will be implemented in future quality improvement measures for diabetic patients at the Rural Health Consortium and may serve as a model for other rural healthcare providers who serve diabetic patients.