Project Title

Virulent Bacteria in Appalachian Tennessee Waters

Authors' Affiliations

Rachel Miller, MD, Alex Yu, and Demetrio Macariola, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee

Location

RIPSHIN MTN. ROOM 130

Start Date

4-4-2018 10:40 AM

End Date

4-4-2018 10:55 AM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Demetrio Macariola, MD

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Pediatrics, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

BACKGROUND:

Over the past 5 years, 634 cases of Shigatoxin E. coli (STEC) infection were reported to Tennessee Health Department 1. At our local children’s hospital, 4-5 children are hospitalized with STEC infection each year. Some of these children had no history of ingesting food items that could have placed them at risk to develop STEC infection; however, there are other ways that humans could get infected, such as exposure to contaminated water from cattle farms 2.

GOALS:

To determine if bodies of water in the city are contaminated with STEC.

METHODS:

Fifty (50) ml of water samples were collected from selected areas of Johnson City, TN. Samples were inoculated to Sorbitol McConkey Agar (SMA) plates under sterile techniques & incubated at 36C for 18 hours under aerobic conditions.

RESULTS:

Table 1 E. coli Strains Isolated from Water Samples

Colony Types

Founders Park

Sinking Creek

Carroll Creek

Cherokee Creek

Colorless

(STEC)

14 (3.5)

24 (6)

32 (8)

35 (8.75)

Pink

(Non-STEC )

8 (2)

3 (0.75)

7 (1.75)

4(1)

DISCUSSION/ CONCLUSION:

All sampled sites were positive for STEC. STEC is a normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle. Around city neighborhoods are pastures, as cattle farming is a major livelihood in Northeastern, TN. It is highly possible that water runoff from these pastures contaminates the waters around the city. Public health measures should be undertaken to inform the community that these waters are contaminated with STEC to prevent STEC infection.

References:

Reportable Conditions. TN Epi-news, TN Health Dept Issue 3, Volume 9, 2016

Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections in Children Associated with Raw Milk & Raw Colostrum From Cows—California, 2006. MMWR Weekly, 57(23); 625-628, June 23, 2008.

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Apr 4th, 10:40 AM Apr 4th, 10:55 AM

Virulent Bacteria in Appalachian Tennessee Waters

RIPSHIN MTN. ROOM 130

BACKGROUND:

Over the past 5 years, 634 cases of Shigatoxin E. coli (STEC) infection were reported to Tennessee Health Department 1. At our local children’s hospital, 4-5 children are hospitalized with STEC infection each year. Some of these children had no history of ingesting food items that could have placed them at risk to develop STEC infection; however, there are other ways that humans could get infected, such as exposure to contaminated water from cattle farms 2.

GOALS:

To determine if bodies of water in the city are contaminated with STEC.

METHODS:

Fifty (50) ml of water samples were collected from selected areas of Johnson City, TN. Samples were inoculated to Sorbitol McConkey Agar (SMA) plates under sterile techniques & incubated at 36C for 18 hours under aerobic conditions.

RESULTS:

Table 1 E. coli Strains Isolated from Water Samples

Colony Types

Founders Park

Sinking Creek

Carroll Creek

Cherokee Creek

Colorless

(STEC)

14 (3.5)

24 (6)

32 (8)

35 (8.75)

Pink

(Non-STEC )

8 (2)

3 (0.75)

7 (1.75)

4(1)

DISCUSSION/ CONCLUSION:

All sampled sites were positive for STEC. STEC is a normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle. Around city neighborhoods are pastures, as cattle farming is a major livelihood in Northeastern, TN. It is highly possible that water runoff from these pastures contaminates the waters around the city. Public health measures should be undertaken to inform the community that these waters are contaminated with STEC to prevent STEC infection.

References:

Reportable Conditions. TN Epi-news, TN Health Dept Issue 3, Volume 9, 2016

Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections in Children Associated with Raw Milk & Raw Colostrum From Cows—California, 2006. MMWR Weekly, 57(23); 625-628, June 23, 2008.