Project Title

Transgender Medicine Integrated Grand Rounds: Are Medical Students Receiving Enough Education to Competently Care for our Patients?

Authors' Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Mt. Mitchell Room 220

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

139

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Ivy Click

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Family Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Student

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Transgender individuals are defined as those whose gender does not match the sex they were assigned at birth. Healthcare providers receive inadequate training in transgender medicine, which could lead to provider stigma and lower health outcomes and higher health disparities. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of an educational intervention on first and second year ETSU medical students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding transgender healthcare. A transgender healthcare-centered Integrated Grand Rounds (IGR) was used as a setting to conduct a 9-item survey regarding definitions, medical management, and attitudes/comfort levels with transgender care. First and second year medical students (n=140) who participated in the intervention had the option to complete pre and post surveys on paper before and after IGR. Of the 140 participants, 138 (98.6%) completed the pretest and posttest measures. The participants’ attitudes about transgender patients and their comfort in treating transgender patients significantly improved between pre and posttest surveys (p

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Transgender Medicine Integrated Grand Rounds: Are Medical Students Receiving Enough Education to Competently Care for our Patients?

Mt. Mitchell Room 220

Transgender individuals are defined as those whose gender does not match the sex they were assigned at birth. Healthcare providers receive inadequate training in transgender medicine, which could lead to provider stigma and lower health outcomes and higher health disparities. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of an educational intervention on first and second year ETSU medical students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding transgender healthcare. A transgender healthcare-centered Integrated Grand Rounds (IGR) was used as a setting to conduct a 9-item survey regarding definitions, medical management, and attitudes/comfort levels with transgender care. First and second year medical students (n=140) who participated in the intervention had the option to complete pre and post surveys on paper before and after IGR. Of the 140 participants, 138 (98.6%) completed the pretest and posttest measures. The participants’ attitudes about transgender patients and their comfort in treating transgender patients significantly improved between pre and posttest surveys (p