Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

12-2001

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

Gunapala Edirisooriya

Committee Members

Elizabeth Ralston, Russell F. West, Russell O. Mays

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the use of computers for instruction in the K-4 elementary schools of the Maryville City School System. A survey was distributed to every regular education classroom teacher in each of the four elementary schools of the system. Respondents were asked to provide: (a) demographic data in regard to age, gender, years of teaching experience, grade level taught, level of education, home computer ownership, and technology committee membership; (b) an implementation score based on teacher response to grade-level student performance indicators provided by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE); and (c) responses to statements pertaining to possible barriers to computer implementation including vision, planning, training, time, and support.

The sample consisted of 83 regular education, K-4 teachers in the Maryville City School system. Data analyses were constructed to analyze three research questions. All testing was conducted at the .05 level of significance. T-tests were used to describe the relationships between the implementation scores provided by respondents and the demographic variables of gender, home computer ownership, technology committee membership, and grade level taught (K-2 or 3-4). A one-way Analysis of Variance was used to describe the relationship between the implementation scores provided by respondents and the demographic variable of level of education. Pearson product-moment correlation tests were used to describe the relationships between the implementation scores provided by respondents and the demographic variables of age and experience as well as respondent scoring as to the presence of the possible barriers of vision, planning, training, time, and support.

The results of the data analyses indicate a statistically significant difference in the perceived implementation scores of K-2 and 3-4 teachers. There were also statistically significant correlations between implementation scores and the possible barriers of vision, planning, training, time, and support. Information gained from this study will be helpful in the design of future technology programs, professional development activities, and ultimately the proper implementation of computers into the K-4 classrooms of the Maryville City School System and those similar to it.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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