Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

8-2001

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

Russell O. Mays

Committee Members

Russell F. West, Nancy Dishner, Elizabeth Ralston

Abstract

Mobility, the movement of students from school to school, affects students, classrooms, schools, and systems. Extensive research has been conducted on the relationship between mobility and student academics. Although the research has not determined mobility is the cause of lower academic scores, it is certainly a contributing factor. Most students with high mobility rates also have difficulty in math, reading, or language. Teachers of classrooms with these students tend to "flatten" the curriculum by reviewing more than usual. Long-range planning for these students can be difficult. Schools and systems may plan programs for students who have moved on by the next year or not have needed programs in place for new students. This study determined strategies that the educational community can use to ease the transition of students from school to school. Using the Delphi technique, a panel of experts suggested, refined, and prioritized strategies for use by the classroom teacher, the school, the school system and the community. This panel was comprised of persons who had experience working with or studying mobile students. Researchers and directors of organizations whose primary function dealt with mobile students were members of the panel. School administrators, teachers, social workers, and guidance counselors from schools who not only have a high mobility rate, but also have developed programs for these students served on the panel as well. Through the use of three rounds of questionnaires, consensus was reached on a number of strategies. The highest ranked strategy for students transferring into and out of the school dwelt with the quick retrieval of complete and up-to-date records. Whenever possible, a transfer slip with pertinent information should be sent with the student. Making the student feel welcome and a part of the school was deemed highly important as was helping the family become familiar with the community. Systems should not only provide staff development in schools with high mobility, but also fund programs geared to meet the needs of these students. Using the strategies suggested by the Delphi Panel, the negative effects of mobility may be lessened.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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