Degree Name

MALS (Master of Arts in Liberal Studies)

Program

Liberal Studies

Date of Award

12-2016

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

Jill LeRoy-Frazier

Committee Members

Marie Tedesco, Joe Keith Green

Abstract

The effects of the colonial project in Kenya created multi-faceted damages to the land and indigenous people-groups. Using the lens of ecofeminism, this study examines the undergirding structures that produce systems such as colonization that oppress and destroy land, people, and other beings. By highlighting the experience of the Kikuyu people within the Kenyan colonial program, the innovative and ingenious response of Wangari Maathai's Green Belt Movement proves to be a relevant and effective counter to women's disempowerment and environmental devastation in a post-colonial nation. The approach of the Green Belt Movement offers a unique and accessible method for empowering women, restoring the land, and addressing loss of cultural identity, while also contributing a theoretical template for addressing climate change.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.