Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

December 1998

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to portray the experiences of African-American tenured female faculty employed within Historically White, public institutions of higher education in Virginia. This study is a portrait of the career paths, teaching experiences, institutional experiences, community and personal activities, work life, and the future of African-Americans. The study focused on personal experiences and provided a grounded recording for other African-American female faculty members employed within comparable institutions of higher education. The interviews also addressed educational preparation, mentoring, expectations, frustrations, difficulties, cultural and collegial experiences. Participants' audio taped responses were transcribed. Similarities that evolved from the discussions were identified. Repeat conversations reflected concerns about the lack of role models, community, activities, isolation, mentoring, and access to professional development opportunities. These women were experiencing some of the same career paths, teaching experiences, institutional experiences, community and personal activities, and work life environments. The findings portrayed women that were very competent. The seven women interviewed had distinctive work ethics and, in spite of overloads in departmental responsibilities, at least six of them had completed some scholarly activities. These scholarly activities included funded grants, books, and community reform projects. These African-American women faculty members are still struggling to enter into the academic mainstream. They are currently working in different and uncertain environments. Being African-American and female places the women in this study in a subordinate role.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access