Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

December 1985

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if significant differences existed in the perceived need deficiencies of secondary teachers who engaged in professional negotiations as compared to those who did not. In addition, attempts were made to determine if significant differences existed in the perceived need deficiencies of male and female secondary teachers, urban and rural secondary teachers, various age groups of secondary teachers, and various experience groups of secondary teachers. Further analysis of the data was conducted to determine if significant differences existed in the perceived need deficiencies of secondary teachers as compared to industrial, governmental and retail workers. The sample included 200 secondary teachers who engaged in professional negotiations and 200 who did not. Respondents included seventy-one secondary teachers who negotiated and another seventy-one who did not. The total number of respondents included 142 secondary teachers, which represented 35.5 percent of the entire sample. The instrument used to collect the data was the "Work Motivation Inventory" which was designed to assess the physiological, safety, love and belonging, ego-status, and self-actualization needs of individuals in the work setting. No significant differences were found in twenty-four of twenty-five null hypotheses. A significant difference was found in the safety needs of secondary teachers who negotiated as compared to those who did not. Additional findings not related to the original twenty-five hypotheses, resulted in significant differences being found in the physiological, safety, belonging, ego-status, and self-actualization needs of secondary teachers when compared to workers from major organizations. The findings indicated that secondary teachers who negotiated had significantly higher safety needs than secondary teachers who did not. Additional findings indicated that secondary teachers had significantly higher physiological, safety, and belonging needs when compared to workers from major organizations. Also, secondary teachers had significantly lower ego-status and self-actualization needs when compared to workers from major organizations. Recommendations were included for future research.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

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