Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

May 1999

Abstract

The purpose of this quantitative research study was to analyze the roles of assistant and associate deans in the colleges or schools related to the disciplines of business, education, and arts and sciences within four different classifications of institutions [Research Universities I and II and Doctoral Universities I and II], as described by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Respondents in the study came from institutions accredited by the Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Respondents included 191 associate deans and 60 assistant deans, of whom 154 were men and 97 were women. Chi-square statistics were used to analyze assistant and associate deans' perceptions of (1) whether their positions are line or staff; (2) whether they would recommend changes in their positions; (3) whether each was interested in becoming deans at their present institution or another institution. Three composite scores from factor analysis were analyzed by three-way ANOVA: (1) Curriculum, (2) Administrative Leadership and Relationships, and (3) Budget. A second statistical analysis included t-tests and a one-way ANOVA for Composite #2, Administrative Leadership and Relationships. Results showed no significant differences in (1) whether assistant and associate deans perceive that deans differentiate their positions as line or staff, and (2) between associate deans and assistant deans in regard to their interest in becoming deans at their institutions. From the factor analysis, results showed no significant differences in Composite #1, Curriculum, for the independent variables: gender, college, gender by college, dean by college, and gender by dean by college. For Composite #2, results showed no significant differences for the independent variables: gender, college, gender by dean, gender by college, dean by college, and gender by dean by college. For Composite #3, Budget, results showed no significant differences for the independent variables: gender, college, gender by college, dean by college, and gender by dean by college. For the second statistical analysis for Composite #2, Administrative Leadership and Relationships, results showed no significant differences between colleges/schools and leadership, and the level of dean and leadership. The results of this study showed that (1) associate deans perceived their positions as line versus staff; (2) associate and assistant deans did not perceive their positions as stepping stones to deanships at their present institutions; (3) associate deans believed their positions were stepping stones to deanships at other institutions; and (4) assistant deans did not perceive their experience at their present institution as a stepping stone to deanships at their present or other institutions. Female associate deans had the most responsibility for Composite #1. Male associate and male assistant deans had approximately the same responsibilities for Composite #1, Curriculum. More associate deans than assistant deans had responsibilities for Composite #2, Administrative Leadership and Relationships and Composite #3, Budget.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Share

COinS