Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

May 1982

Abstract

This study was an analysis of the 1980-81 negotiated teacher contracts in Tennessee to determine the extent and nature of items relating to curriculum and instruction. Using an instrument entitled, "A Taxonomy for the Analysis of Collective Bargaining Agreements with Regard to Implications for Curriculum and Instruction" devised by Raymond E. Babineau, the following information was obtained: the uses made of the terms curriculum and instruction; the elements of articles relating to curriculum, instruction, and evaluation; the percentage of negotiated teacher contracts containing curriculum, instruction, and/or evaluation articles; and correlations between the number of curriculum, instruction, and/or evaluation articles and specific school system characteristics. Data from the sixty-five contracts were classified, quantified, and compared, and the Pearson Product Moment Correlation formula was applied to determine relationships. The findings were: (1) The terms curriculum and instruction were most frequently used as the modifier of a noun with a basic consistency in the definition of each term. (2) Some 49.23 percent of the contracts analyzed contained items relating to curriculum with the area of a curriculum council highest in frequency. (3) One-hundred percent of the contracts analyzed included instruction items with the areas of student discipline and working conditions highest in frequency. (4) Some 81.53 percent of the contracts included evaluation items with the summative evaluation of teachers highest in frequency. (5) A significant relationship at the .20 level was found between the maximum teacher salary and the number of instruction items. (6) A significant relationship at the .10 level was found between the average teacher salary and the number of instruction items. (7) A significant relationship at the .10 level was found between the expenditure per pupil and the number of instruction items.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

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