Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

December 1984

Abstract

The problem of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between selected personal characteristics of higher education administrators and their perceived levels of power motivation and power style. The techniques of ex post facto research were used in this study. The Power Management Inventory developed by Jay Hall and James Hawker was selected as the appropriate instrument for use in this study. The Power Management Inventory was designed to provide a comparison between one's espoused theory (power motivation) and one's theory in action (power style). A personal data sheet was used to obtain information concerning the personal characteristics of the administrators. The statistical analysis of the data for hypotheses 1 through 24 was intended to determine significant differences in the power motivation types and power style scores of the administrators based on a comparison with selected personal characteristics of those administrators. The differences showing significance in the study warranted the following conclusions: (1) The power motivation of administrators can be directly related to the ages of the administrators. (2) The power style of administrators can be directly related to the ages of administrators. (3) The power motivation of administrators can be directly related to the method by which they were selected for their positions. (4) The power style of administrators can be directly related to the method by which they were selected to their positions. (5) The power style of administrators can be directly related to the number of years of service in their positions.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Share

COinS