Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

December 1990

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between industrial and municipal executives' practices and perceptions toward the administrative requirements of a water pollution control system as set forth in a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. This was a descriptive study that utilized a two-part attitudinal survey designed to obtain the perceptions of the executives (N = 171) of all major industries and all major municipalities in the State of Tennessee who had direct responsibility for the administrative requirements of an NPDES permitted water pollution control system. Descriptive statistics were used for the analysis of data with the chi-square formula used for the analysis of the study's three hypotheses. The descriptive analysis of the three hypotheses resulted in the following findings and conclusions: (1) There was no significant difference in what principal executives perceived was the most important administrative requirement of the NPDES permitted water pollution control system ($\chi\sp2$ = 1.44, df = 2). Both categories defined operational problems as the most important administrative requirement. (2) There was a significant difference in what principal executives perceived were the important water quality designated uses achieved by the facility water pollution control system ($\chi\sp2$ = 12.80, df = 6). Industrial respondents perceived "protection of fish and aquatic life" as most important, while municipal executives perceived "domestic and industrial water supply" as most important. (3) There was no significant difference in what principal executives perceived was the direct motivation for the water pollution control system installation, operation, and maintenance ($\chi\sp2$ = 1.65, df = 2). Both categories perceived environmental motivation as the most important reason for the NPDES permit administrative requirements. These findings supported the Clean Water Act regulatory program national objective to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation's waters" (Arbuckle, Frick, Hall, Miller, Sullivan, & Vanderver, 1983, p. 83). The major municipal and industrial facility executives in Tennessee were in agreement that their systems were effective in achieving compliance with the administrative requirements of the permit. The researcher recommended future research to identify specific problems resulting from the administrative requirements of the NPDES permit and replications of the study nationally.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

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