Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

5-2006

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

W. Hal Knight

Committee Members

Elizabeth Ralston, Jasmine R. Renner, Louise L. MacKay

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, association exists between Thinking Maps® instruction and student achievement in fifth grade students in Reading/Language and Mathematics as reported by the State NCE scores of the criterion referenced portion of the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) Achievement Test in 3 Title I elementary schools in northeast Tennessee. The association was examined after 2 years of Thinking Maps® implementation and instruction. Using a quantitative design, the quasiexperimental study included fifth grade students' State NCE scores from 2005 and the same students' State NCE scores from 2003. Scores obtained by fifth grade students who received Thinking Maps® instruction were examined for differences in Reading/Language and Mathematics and were also compared with scores obtained by fifth grade students who did not receive Thinking Maps® instruction for the same 2-year period. Paired t-tests and a 3-factor repeated measures design, repeated on 1 factor, were used to investigate differences in achievement as categorized by Thinking Maps® instruction or no Thinking Maps®instruction for 2 years.

The results of the study indicated that there was a significant difference for the Reading/Language means for students after 2 years of Thinking Maps implementation but not a significant difference for Mathematics. There was not a significant difference between the two treatment schools in either Reading/Language or Mathematics. The 2 treatment schools had different percentages economically disadvantaged students.

The results of the study also indicated that there was a significant 2-way interaction for Year by School in Reading/Language between 1 treatment school and the control school, the 2 schools with similar percentages of economically disadvantaged students. The findings of the tests of simple effect for the differences between the 2003 and 2005 Reading/Language means for the treatment school showed the 2005 Reading/Language mean was over 7 points higher than the 2003 Reading/Language mean. The findings of the tests of simple effect for the differences between the 2003 and 2005 Reading/Language means for the control school were also significant with the 2005 Reading/Language mean being 6 points lower than the 2003 Reading/Language mean.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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