Degree Name

EdD (Doctor of Education)

Program

Educational Leadership

Date of Award

5-2011

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

Virginia P. Foley

Committee Members

Donald W. Good, Elizabeth Ralston, Eric S. Glover

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the perception scores and action scores of teachers in a northeast Tennessee school system in terms of parent involvement. Also, this study examined the relationship between perception scores and action scores of administrators and teachers across the district. Lastly, this study determined if significant differences existed in the perception scores and action scores between elementary, middle, and high school teachers.

Data were collected by questionnaires containing sections for demographic information, perceptions of parent involvement, and actions involving parent involvement. The population consisted of 437 certified teachers and 24 building level administrators. From that population, 298 teachers and 18 administrators responded.

Independent-samples t tests were used to compare the action scores of teachers in a high perception group and a low perception group. As a whole, teachers in the low perception group tended to have lower action scores than those in the high perception group. However, when analyzed by grade level, no significant differences were noted between the high perception and low perception groups.

One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) testing was used to test for differences in the perception scores and action scores of teachers by grade level. Significant differences were noted in the perception scores and action scores between the elementary, middle, and high school groups. A post hoc Tukey procedure clearly indicated that elementary school action scores were significantly different from middle action scores, and middle school action scores were significantly different from high school action scores. A post hoc LSD procedure clearly indicated that elementary school perception scores were significantly different from middle perception scores, and middle school perception scores were significantly different from high school perception scores.

Single-sample t tests revealed a significant difference in the perception scores and action scores of teachers and administrators across the district. In each single-sample t test, the mean administrator score was used as the test value. Each test confirmed that the sample mean was significantly lower than the test value.

This study was important in uncovering information about the perception scores and action scores of teachers and administrators in the area of parent involvement. Parent involvement has been consistently shown to have positive benefits on students but is still an underused resource. Recommendations are made with the intention of helping schools better understand how to serve their students and communities more effectively.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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