Degree Name

MA (Master of Arts)

Program

Communication, Professional

Date of Award

5-2011

Committee Chair or Co-Chairs

John M. King, Stephen W. Marshall

Committee Members

Weixing Chen

Abstract

This study will provide a clearer understanding of the construct, Third World, which may not seem to have a consensus meaning. This is because its perceived definition, which is linked, first to feudalism and then to the socio-politico conditions that existed during the period leading up to and immediately after the cold war means that its conceptual metamorphosis should have ceased once these periods were relegated to the annals of history.

Whether and how contemporary definitions of Third World have changed since then should be of interest to scholars and is the focus of this study. This is because anecdotally speaking the media have reframed this construct in a manner that recreates, so called, Third World nations into the three categories of very Third World, somewhat Third World, and not at all Third World. What this study reveals, however, is that these distinctions and to some extent the designations of nations as first, second, and third worlds are misleading colloquialisms.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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